South Korea gives equipment for conservation of artifacts

Published February 16, 2019
Common heritage of Buddhism is of particular importance for further cementing cultural and religious ties between the two countries. — File photo
Common heritage of Buddhism is of particular importance for further cementing cultural and religious ties between the two countries. — File photo

ISLAMABAD: The embassy of the Republic of Korea on Friday gave the Department of Archaeology and Museums $50,000 worth of equipment for conservation, preservation and treatment of artifacts.

These included stereo-microscope, humidity/environment control equipment, racks for storing antiquity and ultrasonic cleaners to clean metal objects and plant to produce distilled water.

“The equipment will surely be instrumental in promoting the country’s capacity to conserve its cultural heritage to the international level. The project has been administrated jointly by the Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea, Korea Cultural Heritage Foundation and the Department of Archaeology and Museums, Pakistan, with the common aim,” Ambassador Sing-Kyu Kwak said at a ceremony held to hand over the equipment at the Islamabad Museum.

Common heritage of Buddhism is of particular importance for further cementing ties between two countries, ambassador says

Pakistan and South Korea have warm cultural relations, which are deep-routed in history. Common heritage of Buddhism is of particular importance for further cementing cultural and religious ties between the two countries, said the ambassador.

“Republic of Korea and its embassy in Pakistan are committed to increase relations with Pakistan for preservation of cultural heritage and to promote tourism in Pakistan. As part of cooperative efforts, the Korean government has provided the conservation equipment for treating and preserving Pakistan’s movable heritage, especially specimens of the Buddhist art, uncovered from the archaeological remains of Buddhist sanctuaries in the ancient Gandhara region.”

Ambassador Kwak emphasised the importance of promoting cultural ties between the two friendly countries and reviewed the co-projects that were completed in the last two years such as the Gandhara art exhibition, ‘Alexander the Great meets the Buddha’ that was held in Seoul from June to Sept 2017, and a seminar, ‘Hyecho in Gandhara: footsteps of a Korean monk in Pakistan in the 8th century’ in Islamabad in Oct 2018.

He also announced follow-up plans such as capacity building of treating historical artifacts and programme of inviting historical and archaeological officials and academia, preferably from the museums having collection of the Buddhists art of Gandhara, to Korea soon.

Secretary National History and Literary Heritage Division Engineer Aamir Hasan told the gathering that the donation of the equipment for conservation of antiquities would deepen the already existing cooperation in the field of cultural heritage.

Published in Dawn, February 16th, 2019

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