Turkiye’s Erdogan claims victory in presidential election

Published May 28, 2023
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan addresses his supporters following early exit poll results for the second round of the presidential election in Istanbul, Turkiye, May 28. — Reuters
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan addresses his supporters following early exit poll results for the second round of the presidential election in Istanbul, Turkiye, May 28. — Reuters
Supporters of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan react following early exit poll results for the second round of the presidential election outside the provincial headquarters of AK Party (AKP) in Istanbul, Turkiye, May 28. — Reuters
Supporters of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan react following early exit poll results for the second round of the presidential election outside the provincial headquarters of AK Party (AKP) in Istanbul, Turkiye, May 28. — Reuters

President Tayyip Erdogan claimed victory in Turkiye’s presidential election on Sunday, a win that would steer his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade.

Addressing supporters, Erdogan said voters had given him the responsibility to rule for the next five years.

“The only winner is Turkiye,” he said, addressing cheering supporters from atop a bus in Istanbul.

Final official results have yet to be released.

Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif congratulated Erdogan ahead of the final official results, saying that he was “one of few world leaders whose politics has been anchored in public service.

“He has been a pillar of strength for the oppressed Muslims and a fervent voice for their inalienable rights. His presidential victory and that of AKP in parliamentary elections is significant in so many ways, reflecting the trust and confidence of the Turkish people in his dynamic leadership.

“The bilateral relations between Pakistan and Turkiye will continue to stay on an upward trajectory. I keenly look forward to working with him to further deepen our strategic partnership in line with the excellent brotherhood between our two peoples,” Shehbaz tweeted.

Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari said the “historic victory reflects the trust of the Turkish nation in his visionary leadership. Wishing Türkiye eternal peace and prosperity as we continue our unique journey of brotherhood.”

There was no immediate response to Erdogan’s victory speech from his challenger, Kemal Kilicdaroglu.

The election had been seen as one of the most consequential yet for Turkiye, with the opposition believing it had a strong chance of unseating Erdogan after his popularity was hit by a cost-of-living crisis.

Instead, victory will reinforce his image of invincibility, after having already redrawn domestic, economic, security and foreign policy in the Nato member country of 85 million people and positioned Turkiye as a regional power.

Supporters gathered at his Istanbul residence in anticipation of victory as data reported by both state-run Anadolu agency and the opposition ANKA news agency gave him the edge with nearly 99 per cent of ballot boxes counted.

The head of the High Election Board earlier told a news conference that Erdogan was leading Kilicdaroglu with 54.47pc support, with 54.6pc of ballot boxes logged.

Erdogan, head of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, appealed to voters with nationalist and conservative rhetoric during a divisive campaign that deflected attention from deep economic troubles.

The defeat of Kilicdaroglu, who promised to set the country on a more democratic and collaborative path, would likely be cheered in Moscow but mourned in Western capitals and much of the Middle East after Turkiye took a more confrontational and independent stance in foreign affairs.

Erdogan supporters who were gathered outside his Istanbul residence chanted Allahu Akbar, or God is Greatest.

“I expect everything to become better,” said Nisa, 28, a headscarved woman wearing a headband with Erdogan’s name.

Another Erdogan supporter said Turkiye would get stronger with him in office for five more years.

“There are issues, problems in every country around the world, in European countries as well … With strong leadership we will overcome Turkiye’s problems as well,” said Mert, 39, who had come to celebrate with his son.

Bugra Oztug, 24, who voted for Kilicdaroglu, said she was not surprised at the result, blaming the opposition for failing to change.

“I feel sad and disappointed but I am not hopeless. I still think there are people who can see the realities and truth,” Oztug said.

Erdogan’s performance has wrong-footed opponents who also thought voters would punish him over the state’s initially slow response to devastating earthquakes in February, in which more than 50,000 people died.

But in the first round of voting on May 14, which included parliamentary elections, his AK Party emerged top in 10 of the 11 provinces hit by the earthquakes, helping it secure a parliamentary majority along with its allies.

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