Pentagon apologises after admitting drone strike in Kabul killed 10 civilians

Published September 18, 2021
US Marine Corps General Frank McKenzie, the commander of US Central Command, arrives at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, in this photo taken on August 17, 2021. — Reuters/File
US Marine Corps General Frank McKenzie, the commander of US Central Command, arrives at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, in this photo taken on August 17, 2021. — Reuters/File

WASHINGTON: A drone strike in Kabul last month killed as many as 10 civilians, including seven children, the US military said on Friday, apologising for what it said was a tragic mistake.

The Pentagon had said the Aug 29 strike targeted a suicide bomber of the militant Islamic State group who posed an imminent threat to US-led troops at the airport as they completed the last stages of their withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Even as reports of civilian casualties emerged, the top US general had described the attack as “righteous”.

“At the time of the strike, I was confident that the strike had averted an imminent threat to our forces at the airport,” Marine Corps General Frank McKenzie, the head of US Central Command, had told reporters. “Our investigation now concludes that the strike was a tragic mistake.”

He said he now believed it unlikely that those killed were members of the local Islamic State affiliate or posed a direct threat to US forces. The Pentagon was considering reparations, Gen McKenzie said.

In a statement, Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin said the drone strike had killed a Mr Ahmadi, who worked for a non-profit called Nutrition and Education International.

“We now know that there was no connection between Mr Ahmadi and ISIS-Khorasan, that his activities on that day were completely harmless and not at all related to the imminent threat we believed we faced,” Austin said in the statement.

“We apologise, and we will endeavour to learn from this horrible mistake.”

While it is rare for senior Pentagon officials, including the defence secretary, to apologise personally for civilians killed in military strikes, the US military does put out reports on civilians killed in operations around the world.

Reports had emerged almost immediately that the drone strike had killed civilians, including children.

A spokesman for Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers, Zabihullah Mujahid, had said at the time that the attack had killed seven people.

The strike came three days after a suicide bomber killed 13 US troops and scores of Afghan civilians who had crowded outside the airport, desperate to secure seats on evacuation flights.

Following the suicide bombing at the airport, the US military launched a drone strike in eastern Afghanistan that it said killed two IS militants, and the Pentagon had warned that it expected more attacks on the airport, including from rockets and vehicle-borne explosive devices.

Published in Dawn, September 18th, 2021

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