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LAHORE: Chief Justice of Pakistan (CJP) Mian Saqib Nisar on Saturday took suo motu notice of excessive payments made to independent power producers (IPPs) and issued notices to them.

While hearing multiple public interest cases at the Lahore registry of the Supreme Court, the CJP observed that the billions of rupees paid to the IPPs had ballooned the circular debt.

“Apparently, the matter involves Rs1.5 billion,” he added.

Says judiciary has a key role to play in protection of fundamental rights of people

While issuing notices to 10 IPPs, the CJP fixed the case for hearing on Sunday (today).

Meanwhile, speaking at a function hosted by the Lahore Institute of Health Sciences (LIHS), the CJP said that the judiciary had a key role in protection of the fundamental rights of people. He regretted that education was the most neglected sector in the country. He said no society or nation could thrive without a good education system, adding that education and health should not be considered business activities.

“Lack of education results in a down-trodden society,” the CJP said, adding that he had always been concerned over such low literacy rate in Pakistan.

Recalling his visits to education institutions around the country, CJP Nisar said a majority of Balochistan areas either had no schools or schools there lacked basic facilities such as boundary walls, toilets and clean drinking water.

He pointed out that in some of the areas school premises had become stables for animals of local landlords.

The CJP said an honest leadership was crucial for progress and prosperity of any country. He said the law made by the colonial British rulers and being followed in Pak­is­tan was not in consonance with Islam and local traditions. He also stressed the need for synchronising the existing laws with contemporary demands.

Published in Dawn, January 6th, 2019

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