Jemima says has tracked down old bank statements to 'prove' Imran Khan's money trail

Published June 1, 2017
Imran Khan and Jemima Goldsmith were married from 1995 to 2004. — File
Imran Khan and Jemima Goldsmith were married from 1995 to 2004. — File

In a tweet on Thursday, Jemima Goldsmith, Imran Khan's former wife, announced that she has "finally tracked down 15 year old bank statements" to substantiate Imran Khan's claims about his financial transactions in ongoing cases in the Supreme Court (SC) and the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP)

"Finally tracked down 15 year old bank statements to prove Imran Khan's money trail/innocence in court. Now please go after the real crooks," the tweet read.

Petitions seeking the disqualification of Imran Khan and Jahangir Tareen over the non-disclosure of assets, their ownership of offshore companies and for being a foreign-funded party are currently being heard in both the SC and the ECP.

With reference to the cases, Khan has repeatedly claimed that he he has done nothing wrong and that any money he brought into the country was brought through legal means.

The most recent of these claims were made in a series of tweets in which Khan first said that no matter who investigates him, there will only be one conclusion: "Whether the Supreme Court investigates [my case] or forms a Joint Investigation Team ... here is my challenge: whatever they want to do, they will come to only one conclusion"

He elaborated that he bought his London property with the money he made through playing cricket:

"I bought [the] London flat from taxed legit cricket earnings in 1983; sold it in 2003 & brought funds back thru legit banking channels"

According to his tweets Khan paid for the Bani Gala property through the money he had made out of selling the London flat in 2003:

"Paid for purchase of Bani Gala property from these earned funds remitted back to Pakistan."

Disqualification case in SC

The complainant in the SC, Hanif Abbasi, has argued that by not disclosing Niazi Services Limited (NSL) — an entity which was dissolved in 2015 — in his income tax returns and before the ECP, Khan had ceased to be honest and should therefore be disqualified.

In the most recent hearing of the case, held on Wednesday (May 31), Khan's lawyer, Naeem Bokhari, argued that his client’s non-disclosure of NSL was an error of “omission”, not an act of “dishonesty”.

During his arguments Bokhari said that while he would accept if the apex court found his client guilty of gross misconduct or dishonesty, the court should remember that in this country of 220 million people, less than one million people regularly submitted their tax returns.

The counsel highlighted how Khan’s name appeared nowhere in documents from Jersey Island, where NSL was incorporated, furnished by the petitioner. Rather, his sisters, Aleema Khan and Uzma Khan, were directors of the company, though they did not own a single share.

Case in ECP

In a disqualification case being heard in the ECP regarding Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf's (PTI) alleged foreign funding, the party had filed a petition in the Islamabad High Court (IHC) challenging the powers of the ECP to hear private complaints about party funds.

On Wednesday, holding that it has the absolute jurisdiction to scrutinise the accounts of a political party any time, the ECP on Wednesday told PTI to submit relevant financial documents to it by June 22.

In the same hearing, PTI once again failed to produce the financial documents and, instead, took the plea that since a similar matter was pending before the SC, hearing should be postponed until instructions from the apex court were received.

Conceding to the PTI's demand, the ECP adjourned the case till June 22.

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