Four "hardcore terrorists" tried by military courts were hanged on Tuesday, an Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR) statement said.

The four were said to be involved in "committing heinous offences related to terrorism, including killing of innocent civilians, attacking armed forces of Pakistan and law enforcement agencies (LEAs)," ISPR said.

Details of hanged convicts released by ISPR:

Rehmanuddin was an active member of Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and was accused of attacking armed forces of Pakistan, LEAs and killing a member of a peace committee. He was in possession of fire-arms and explosives when he was arrested. The convict admitted to offences before a magistrate and the trial court.

Mushtaq Khan was an active member of TTP. He was said to be involved in attacking LEAs, resulting in the death of several soldiers. He was also in possession of fire-arms and explosives at the time of arrest. He admitted his offences before a magistrate and the trial court.

Obaidur Rehman was said to be an active member of TTP who killed innocent civilians. He was also in possession of explosives when caught. The convict admitted to his offences before a magistrate and the trial court.

Zafar Iqbal was termed an active member of TTP. He was alleged to have carried out attacks on LEAs, resulting in the death of a Junior Commissioned Officer and a soldier of Frontier Constabulary. A police assistant sub inspector and an FC soldier also sustained injuries as a result of attacks by the convict. He was also in possession of fire-arms and explosives. The convict admitted his offences before a magistrate and the trial court.

Military courts

Military courts were disbanded on January 7, 2017, after a sunset clause included in the legal provisions under which the tribunals were established, expired.

However, on March 31 President Mamnoon Hussain gave his formal assent to the Pakistan Army Act 2017 and the 23rd Constitutional Amendment Bill ─ the two pieces of legislation aimed at granting legal cover to military courts ─ after they were cleared by the parliament and senate.

The courts were subsequently revived and given legal cover from the day of their disbandment.

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