Iraq-Bombing-670
— File Photo by AFP

BAGHDAD: Three blasts, including a suicide bomber attack near an army base, killed at least 16 people and wounded 50 more in Baghdad on Tuesday, police and hospital sources said.

The blasts struck an Iraqi army checkpoint south of Baghdad, a military base north of the capital, and a mostly Shia neighbourhood in north Baghdad, the officials said.

In the deadliest attack, six people were killed when a car bomb was detonated near an army camp in the town of Taji, 25 kilometres north of Baghdad, an army officer and a medical official said.

At least 20 other people were wounded.

South of the capital in the town of Mahmudiyah, at least five people were killed and 14 others wounded by a suicide car bomb, officials said.

And a car bomb near a market in the north Baghdad neighbourhood of Shuala killed five people and wounded 12.

No group claimed responsibility.

Tuesday's violence came after four days of relative calm in Iraq following a spate of attacks claimed by Al Qaeda's front group that left at least 88 people dead on January 15-17, according to an AFP tally.

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