Studies prove that heart vaccines can prevent and reduce the risks of heart diseases.—File Photo

A team headed by Prof Prediman Shah from Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in the United States and Prof Nilsson from Lund University in Sweden, along with a team of other researchers, claim that a vaccine is being developed to prevent heart attacks. Scientists believe that the vaccine could be made available to the public in five years, according to a report published in The Indian Express.

The study states that the formation of fatty plaques in blood vessels is one of the main reasons which cause heart attacks. The experiments conducted by a  team of scientists prove that it is possible to change the way human immune system reacts to plaques present in the arteries. The experiments also show that the vaccines can reduce the inflammation and severity of the formation of plaques.

The team has successfully developed a formula for the vaccine which can reduce the plaque formation by 60 to 70 per cent in mice and the vaccine currently awaits regulatory clearance for clinical trials.

 

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