The compound in Abbottabad where the former al Qaeda chief was killed in a US forces raid on May 2, 2011.—File Photo

ISLAMABAD: A member of the high-level Pakistani Abbottabad commission tasked with detailing the May 2 incidents in Abbottabad that resulted in the killing of Osama bin Laden, has completed recording his findings, according to a BBC Urdu report published on Thursday.

The findings are based on statements from bin Laden’s family, his neighbours, and the government officials who entered the area after the raid, said the report.

Questioning the American position on the raid, the details contradict, and are different from, the version of events described by the US. The findings will also be the first official version of the events from the Pakistani side.

A major question raised in the report is the finding that only a single bullet-casing and bullet-mark was found from the room which was allegedly filled with more than half a dozen armed companions of the former al Qaeda chief.

The bullet mark was found on a wall in bin Laden’s bedroom, the same room where he was killed. The mark is so high on the wall that it appears as if the man firing bullet was on his knees. The commission’s experts have concluded that this bullet caused bin Laden’s death, and possibly hit the wall after tearing through a part of his skull, adds the BBC report.

Other than this, no other bullet-casing or bullet-marks were found from the compound. However, the commission’s members found more than a dozen Klashnikov rifles – some less than a yard away from the dead bodies, adds the report.

The report raises the question that why did bin Laden’s companions not fire a single bullet at the US Marines, because the American version of events states that not a single soldier was hit. Now if no soldier was hit, and not even a single shot had gone astray — which was proved by the absence of bullet casings and marks — then why did Osama’s companions not fire a single bullet, the commission findings inquire.

Opinion

Editorial

No pardon for rape
Updated 07 Feb, 2023

No pardon for rape

Cultural filters and biases can often lead to faulty applications of the law.
Health insurance
07 Feb, 2023

Health insurance

THE planning ministry is reported to have raised objections to Punjab’s flagship universal health coverage...
The people’s demands
07 Feb, 2023

The people’s demands

AS the people of KP are literally on the frontline of the battle against terrorism and violent extremism, they are...
The Musharraf enigma
Updated 06 Feb, 2023

The Musharraf enigma

The Musharraf era holds numerous lessons for Pakistan’s ruling elite, civilian and military.
Staying neutral
06 Feb, 2023

Staying neutral

THE Election Commission of Pakistan has what is perhaps one of the most thankless jobs in the country. The countless...
Wikipedia ban
06 Feb, 2023

Wikipedia ban

THE country was back in a familiar, dark place last week when the PTA blocked Wikipedia over the charge that it...