In memoriam 20081028

Published October 28, 2008

MUHAMMAD Rafiq Rajput, officer, Wildlife Department, Sindh, died on Oct 12, leaving behind in grief the community of wildlife lovers, conservationists as well as institutions involved in the research of biodiversity.

He had a very long association with field surveys and was a very knowledgeable field worker. His death is an irreparable loss with reference to wildlife surveys and research in Pakistan.

During a survey of Balochistan, he captured a live snake called `sanchoor` (Indian krait), a deadly poisonous snake. He reached home on Oct 12. When he was shifting the snake from the jar into the cage, the snake bit him. His family members rushed him to the Jinnah Hospital, but unfortunately the hospital did not have any serum to treat a snake-bite patient. Doctors told his family members that the serum will be available in the Aga Khan Hospital and it will cost him Rs5,000.

The family members first returned home to make arrangement for the money and then visited the Aga Khan Hospital. When they returned to the JPMC, it was already late. Rafiq Rajput had already died. May Allah rest his soul in eternal peace.

Our health authorities should ensure availability of life-saving drugs in all government hospitals so that no one may lose his life just for want of such medicines.

ABRARUL HASAN

Zoological Survey DepartmentKarachi

(II)

THE death of Professor A. Majid Memon, a veteran gynaecologist, on Oct 16 has created a vacuum in the profession he followed.

He served the Dow Medical College as a professor and then as principal for many years with distinction and devotion.

The fact that he was a true academician reflected in his textbook on gynecology and obstetrics. His students are spread all over the world and are carrying his mission forward. After retirement from the Dow Medical College, he joined a private institution that was literally blessed with his expertise and academic input.

He served that institution as dean for a while and later on became a postgraduate adviser. His quest for knowledge and refinement in medical discipline continued until the last day of his life.

People like him are born in years. He deserves great tribute for his achievement in and contribution to the medical field.

DR AMIN A. GADITCanada

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