Amnesty International has opposed the trial of May 9 protesters in military or special counter-terrorism court.

“Those arrested in connection with the recent protests must have their fair trial rights respected, including the presumption of innocence, and independence and impartiality of the tribunal. They should not be tried in military courts or special counter-terrorism courts,” it said in a statement.

“Respect for the right to liberty also requires a presumption that they are granted bail. Every single person arrested is entitled to protections guaranteed under local and international law, including the right to have their case heard promptly before a judge or official, to be made aware of their charges, and to be treated humanely and with dignity.

The courts that try them must be independent, impartial, and competent, and must respect the guarantees of fairness, including those set out in Article 14 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights,“ the human rights watchdog said.

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