Blinken says Taliban 'grossly' violated Doha agreement by sheltering al Qaeda's Zawahiri

Published August 2, 2022
<p>US Secretary of State Antony Blinken. — AFP</p>

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken. — AFP

The Taliban “grossly” violated the Doha Agreement by hosting and sheltering al Qaeda’s top leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, the US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said on Monday.

The United States killed leader Zawahiri in a strike in Afghanistan over the weekend, President Joe Biden said on Monday, the biggest blow to the militant group since its founder Osama bin Laden was killed in 2011.

“In the face of the Taliban’s unwillingness or inability to abide by their commitments, we will continue to support the Afghan people with robust humanitarian assistance and to advocate for the protection of their human rights, especially of women and girls,” Blinken said in a statement.

The Taliban admitted earlier Tuesday that the US had carried out a drone strike, but gave no details of casualties — and did not name Zawahiri, who was considered a key plotter of the 9/11 attacks on the United States.

On Sunday, the interior ministry had denied reports of a drone strike, but Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said Tuesday that was because an investigation was underway.

Pakistan stands by ‘countering terrorism’

Separately, in a statement issued today, the Foreign Office said that Pakistan stood by countering terrorism in accordance with international law and relevant United Nations resolutions.

“We have seen the official statements by the United States and media reports regarding a counter-terrorism operation carried out by the US in Afghanistan,” Spokesman Asim Iftikhar Ahmad said.

“Pakistan condemns terrorism in all its forms and manifestations,” he asserted, adding that the country’s role and sacrifices in the fight against terrorism were well-known.

Afghans cast doubt on killing of Al-Qaeda chief

Meanwhile, many Afghans expressed shock or doubt Tuesday that Al-Qaeda’s chief had been killed in Kabul by a US drone strike, saying they couldn’t believe Ayman Al-Zawahiri had been hiding in their midst.

“It’s just propaganda,” Fahim Shah, 66, a resident of the Afghan capital, told AFP.

A senior US official said the 71-year-old was on the balcony of a three-storey house in the upmarket Sherpur neighbourhood when targeted with two Hellfire missiles shortly after dawn Sunday.

“We have experienced such propaganda in the past and there was never anything in it,” Shah said. “In reality, I don’t think he was killed here.”

Kabul resident Abdul Kabir said he heard the strike Sunday morning, but still called on the United States to prove who was killed.

“They should show to the people and to the world that ‘we had hit this man and here is the evidence’,” Kabir said.

“We think they killed somebody else and announced it was the Al-Qaeda chief… there are many other places he could be hiding — in Pakistan, or even in Iraq.”

The strike is sure to further sour already bitter relations between Washington and the Taliban, which pledged to stop Afghanistan from being a sanctuary for militants as part of the agreement that led to the US troop withdrawal last year.

University student Mohammad Bilal was another who thought it unlikely Zawahiri had been living in Kabul.

“This is a terrorist group and I do not think they will send their leader to Afghanistan,” Bilal said.

“Leaders of most terrorist groups, including the Taliban, were either living in Pakistan or in the United Arab Emirates when they were in conflict with former Afghan forces,” he said.

A straw poll, however, found some believers in the capital. Kabul housewife Freshta, who asked not to be further identified, said she was shocked to learn of Zawahiri’s killing.

“It’s so uncomfortable to know that he was living here,” she said. A shopkeeper who also asked not to be named said he too wasn’t surprised.

“Any terrorist group can enter our land, use it and get out easily,” he told AFP. “We don’t have a good government. We are unable to protect ourselves, our soil and our property. “

Opinion

Editorial

Taking stock
Updated 14 Aug, 2022

Taking stock

There are numerous reasons behind our predicament, and many of our wounds are self-inflicted.
Medicine in short supply
14 Aug, 2022

Medicine in short supply

THAT rising import prices of pharmaceutical raw materials and increasing production costs of manufacturers have...
Police excesses
Updated 13 Aug, 2022

Police excesses

Crass thuggery and victimisation of ordinary citizens are unlikely to earn govt plaudits from any quarter.
Afghan cleric’s killing
13 Aug, 2022

Afghan cleric’s killing

THAT a suicide bomber belonging to the self-styled Islamic State group managed to target a senior Taliban cleric in...
No room for hockey
13 Aug, 2022

No room for hockey

THERE have been accusations and clarifications as the blame game rumbles on. Yet despite workers of the PTI ...
Militancy redux
Updated 12 Aug, 2022

Militancy redux

There is fear and confusion all around, and it is for the state to bring clarity to the situation.