Complete withdrawal imminent as last US troops leave biggest air base in Afghanistan

Published July 2, 2021
Bagram Air Base served as the linchpin for US operations in Afghanistan. — AFP
Bagram Air Base served as the linchpin for US operations in Afghanistan. — AFP

All US and Nato troops have left the biggest air base in Afghanistan, a US defence official told AFP on Friday, signalling the complete withdrawal of foreign forces from the country was imminent after two decades of war.

Bagram Air Base served as the linchpin for US operations in the rugged country, where the long war against the Taliban and their Al Qaeda allies was fought with air strikes and resupply missions from the airfield.

“All coalition forces are off Bagram,” said the official — who asked not to be identified — without specifying when the last foreign troops left the base, 50 kilometres north of the capital Kabul.

He did not say when it would be officially handed over to Afghan forces, but Ministry of Defence Spokesman Rohullah Ahmadzai said government authorities were “fully prepared” to take over the base.

The US military and Nato are in the final stages of winding up involvement in Afghanistan, bringing home an unspecified number of remaining troops by a deadline of September 11.

The Taliban have launched relentless offensives across Afghanistan in the past two months, gobbling up dozens of districts as Afghan security forces have largely consolidated their power in the country's major urban areas.

The ability of Afghan forces to maintain control of Bagram airfield will likely prove pivotal to maintaining security in Kabul and keeping pressure on the Taliban.

Read more: No recognition if Taliban take Kabul by force, warns US

The exit of foreign forces from Bagram base “symbolises that Afghanistan is alone, abandoned, and left to defend itself against the Taliban's onslaught”, said Australia-based Afghanistan expert Nishank Motwani.

“Having reached home, Americans and allied forces will now watch what they fought so hard to build over 20 years burn down from afar and knowing that the Afghan men and women they fought with risk losing everything.”

'A lot of insecurity'

Media reports say the Pentagon will probably retain about 600 US troops in Afghanistan to guard the vast US diplomatic compound in Kabul.

Residents from Bagram said security will only deteriorate with the exit of foreign forces.

“The situation is already chaotic [...] there is a lot of insecurity and the government does not have (enough) weapons and equipment,” Matiullah, who owns a footwear shop in Bagram bazaar, told AFP.

“Since they started the withdrawal, the situation has got worse. There is no work [...] there is no business,” said Fazal Karim, a bicycle mechanic.

Over the years the mini-city has been visited by hundreds of thousands of US and Nato service members and contractors.

At one point it boasted swimming pools, cinemas and spas — and even a boardwalk featuring fast food outlets such as Burger King and Pizza Hut.

The base also housed a prison that held thousands of inmates.

Bagram was built by the US for its Afghan ally during the Cold War in the 1950s as a bulwark against the Soviet Union in the north.

Ironically, it became the staging point for the Soviet invasion of the country in 1979, and the Red Army expanded it significantly during its near-decade-long occupation.

When Moscow pulled out, Bagram became central to the raging civil war — it was reported that at one point the Taliban controlled one end of the 3km runway and the opposition Northern Alliance the other.

In recent months, Bagram has come under rocket barrages claimed by the militant Islamic State, stirring fears that militants are already eyeing the base for future attacks.

As of May 2021, there were about 9,500 foreign troops in Afghanistan, of which US troops made up the largest contingent of 2,500.

So far Germany and Italy have both confirmed the full withdrawal of their contingents.

Also read: Rapid developments may undermine Pakistan influence in Afghanistan: report

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