More than seven long years after they first ventured onto the big screen, the Croods are finally back with a new adventure. The prehistoric family went on a search for a new home in their 2013 outing and they now continue their journey in the sequel A New Age.

As the proceedings commence, we catch up with the Palaeolithic pack that includes the stubborn patriarch Grug (voiced by Nicolas Cage), his wife Ugga (Catherine Keener), their rebellious teenage daughter Eep (Emma Stone), pre-teen son Thunk (Clark Duke), and youngest child Sandy (Kailey Crawford), as well as Ugga’s mother Gran (Cloris Leachman).

Grug is still annoyed by Eep’s relationship with Guy (Ryan Reynolds) who wandered into their lives in the first film, and he is worried that the pack will split up. A series of events lead the Croods to encounter the Bettermans — husband Phil (Peter Dinklage), wife Hope (Leslie Mann), and daughter Dawn (Kelly Marie Tran) — who live in a giant tree house and appear to be a couple of rungs up the evolutionary ladder.

At first seemingly friendly, the families soon begin to clash. But when a threat emerges that could impact both the households, the Croods and the Bettermans must put aside their differences and work together, learning lessons about unity along the way.

With many characters and way too many subplots, the proceedings quickly become quite chaotic. Luckily enough, there is much fun to be had amidst this chaos. It’s an enjoyable adventure that delivers positive lessons and moments of mirth.

That said, however, it doesn’t always work uniformly well for viewers of all ages. The slapstick humour is better suited for children than adults; on the other hand, Eep and Guy’s relationship drama isn’t likely to engage very young viewers.

Still, while it may not be a masterpiece, The Croods: A New Age will keep you entertained for an hour and a half, even if it doesn’t leave a very lasting impression.

The Croods: A New Age is rated PG by the MPAA.

Published in Dawn, Young World, June 26th, 2021

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