200 Rohingya caught fleeing Bangladeshi camps by boat

Published December 18, 2019
More than 730,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar to Bangladesh in 2017 to escape a military-led crackdown that UN investigators have said was carried out with genocidal intent and included mass killings and rapes. — AFP/File
More than 730,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar to Bangladesh in 2017 to escape a military-led crackdown that UN investigators have said was carried out with genocidal intent and included mass killings and rapes. — AFP/File

YANGON: Myanmar detained 173 Rohingya Muslims on a boat off the southern coast, authorities said on Tuesday, amid signs that more members of the minority group are making perilous sea voyages to escape persecution.

The navy seized the vessel carrying the group, including 22 children, off the coast of Tanintharyi Divisions Kawthaung township on Sunday, military spokesman Tun Tun Nyi said.

Our navy found them on a suspicious boat in the sea, he said. The police will proceed according to the law.

More than 730,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar to Bangladesh in 2017 to escape a military-led crackdown that UN investigators have said was carried out with genocidal intent and included mass killings and rapes.

Myanmar has denied widespread atrocities, framing the violence as a response to attacks by Rohingya militants, but has acknowledged killings at Inn Din village, where soldiers and Buddhist villagers murdered 10 Muslim men, as well as in another village, Gu Dar Pyin. Myanmar has also denied persecution.

Some 600,000 Rohingya remain in largely Buddhist Myanmar, confined to camps and villages in the western Rakhine state where they are unable to travel freely or access healthcare and education.

Three Rohingya living in Myanmar’s western Rakhine state said they had heard the boat was bound for Malaysia. They asked not to be named for fear of retribution.

For years, Rohingya on both sides of the border have boarded boats organised by smugglers in the dry months between November and March, when the sea is calm. The dangerous journey to Thailand and Malaysia has cost many lives.

The exodus peaked in 2015 when an estimated 25,000 people crossed the Andaman Sea, many drowning in unsafe and overloaded boats. But smuggling has continued.

Myat Thu, assistant director of Kawthaung townships administrative office, said it was not yet clear whether the group arrested on Sunday set sail from Myanmar or Bangladesh.

Now we keep them at an island in Kawthaung in the sea, with security guards, he said. We are making sure that all of their human rights are protected.

Published in Dawn, December 18th, 2019

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