Hafizabad man murders daughter, son-in-law and grandsons over 'honour': police

Published September 8, 2018
Police officers inspect the site of the crime in Hafizabad. — Photo by author
Police officers inspect the site of the crime in Hafizabad. — Photo by author

A man from a village in Punjab's Hafizabad district turned himself in on Saturday after he allegedly killed his daughter, her husband and their two children in what police suspect is a case of 'honour killing'.

According to police, the suspect was angry at his daughter Sana for marrying a man named Firdous of her free will four years ago. However, after some time he claimed to have reconciled with his daughter.

Police said the man invited his daughter, son-in-law and grandsons — aged two and three — to his house and once they arrived, he allegedly attacked them with a sharp-edged weapon.

The bodies of the victims have been shifted to the tehsil headquarters hospital for post-mortem examination and a case is being registered against the suspected killer in the Jalalpur Bhattian police station. The anti-terrorism section will also be added in the first information report, a police official told DawnNewsTV.

Honour killings continue despite new law

Scores of people in Pakistan, an overwhelming majority of whom are women, are still being murdered by relatives for bringing 'shame' on their family, more than a year since new laws came into force aimed at stemming the menace of 'honour killings'.

In October 2016, a joint sitting of both houses of parliament passed two key pro-women bills that had been pending assent for a long time.

The move at that time was cautiously hailed by women's rights activists. More than a year on, however, lawyers and activists say honour killings are still occurring at an alarming pace.

At least 280 such murders were recorded by the independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan from October 2016 to June 2017 ─ a figure believed to be understated and incomplete.

The legislation mandates life imprisonment for honour killings, but whether a murder can be defined as a crime of honour is left to the judge's discretion.

That means the culprits can simply claim another motive and still be pardoned, according to Dr Farzana Bari, a widely respected activist and head of the Gender Studies Department at Islamabad's Quaid-i-Azam University.

Opinion

Activism in verse
07 May 2021

Activism in verse

Poetry speaks louder than prose when it comes to making an impact.
Missing women
07 May 2021

Missing women

In terms of gender parity, we are among the worst.
Mixed signals on rights
Updated 06 May 2021

Mixed signals on rights

Government officials continue to call human rights standards alien to Pakistan’s ground realities.

Editorial

Reprimanding envoys
Updated 07 May 2021

Reprimanding envoys

The prime minister should have engaged with honest and respectable officers to identify how solutions can be found.
07 May 2021

Foreign funding case

THE foreign funding case against the PTI has become a never-ending tale. It has been dragging on for years and after...
07 May 2021

Water woes

IRRIGATION experts have voiced concern over the decline of freshwater flow through Kotri barrage, which has led to...
Proceed with caution
Updated 06 May 2021

Proceed with caution

The slightest loosening of SOP protocols could send us hurling in the direction where India finds itself today.
06 May 2021

IPP dues

THE ECC decision to pay the first tranche of outstanding dues of one set of IPPs, and further delay the payments of...
06 May 2021

Violence against doctors

HEALTHCARE workers and doctors’ associations in two major hospitals of KP are adamant that the KP Healthcare...