KARACHI: The Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT) on Friday opened its state-of-the-art Bashir Dawood Transplant Operating The­atre Complex equipped to carry out up to four transplant surgeries simultaneously.

In this connection, a programme was organised at the SIUT’s Suleman Dawood Transplant Centre.

The audience at the ceremony was told that the centre would hugely help the country’s celebrated hospital, which provides free services for all.

Dr Adibul Hasan Rizvi, director of SIUT, welcomed the guests at the inauguration ceremony and highlighted the history and services of the SIUT.

“All these facilities are for everyone with no discrimination of caste, colour, creed or faith,” said Dr Rizvi.

The audience was informed the transplant theatre complex included a large recovery section and a 10-bed intensive care unit.

“The addition of the theatre complex will permit transplant surgeries of kidney, liver, pancreas and small intestines,” said Dr Rizvi.

He said the SIUT had been lucky that it earned extensive support from the philanthropic segment of the society who on the basis of its outstanding services posed confidence in the institution and donated funds and equipments generously.

Dr Rizvi said the relationship with Bashir Dawood and his family went back to the year 2000 when they donated 120 dialysis machines.

“Today the SIUT is performing some 850 dialyses every day,” he said.

In 2006, he said, Bashir Dawood donated a 150-bed cancer hospital in the name of his mother Hanifa Suleman Dawood costing Rs2 billion.

“The hospital houses linear accelerator, the most expensive machine in the medical sector for the radiation treatment of all cancers.”

Dr Rizvi said Bashir Dawood represented a legacy in healthcare for the underprivileged from dialysis to oncology to transplantation.

Bashir Dawood appreciated the role of SIUT in providing specialised medical treatment to the underprivileged segment of society.

Vice chairperson of the board of SIUT, Zubeida Mustafa and trustee Shabbar Zaidi also spoke.

Published in Dawn, March 3rd, 2018

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