World-class Test batsman Younis Khan said in an interview that he may reconsider his retirement plans if the Pakistani team still needs him, Australian media reported Saturday.

The 39-year-old record-breaking cricketer had announced his retirement from international cricket earlier in April.

However, ahead of the first Test in Jamaica, Khan told cricket.com.au that though he believed it was the right time for him to retire, he would consider revising his decision if Pakistan requests him continue playing.

"I could have played more... But I think the right time to retire is when people want you to stay, not when they are thinking your time is up," he said. "I think it is a good time for me retire."

"If they (Pakistan) request me or people want me then why not? But it all depends on my team."

Earlier, Misbah-ul-Haq, captain of Pakistan's Test team, also announced the Test series in the Caribbean will be his last.

In his column at cricket.com.au, he said he has urged Khan to reconsider his decision to retire, adding that he is vital for the team and that the "gap left by Younis' absence will be difficult to fill".

"I talked to him about it in Australia and told him that you can play on," he said.

"My personal feeling is that Pakistan still needs Younis Khan and he can play for another year or two, but I'm not sure if others agree with me or not."

"The Pakistan team will not just miss him as a batsman, they'll also miss him as a mentor."

"He has been a terrific role model for everyone and it will be very tough to replace him," Misbah wrote.

"Every member of this team, including myself, has learnt a lot from him. He has changed our dressing room culture. If one wants to be successful in professional life, one only needs to regard Younis Khan's organised and punctual lifestyle from breakfast to bed."

Khan has been a busy batsman at the crease. His batting style, in all its uniqueness, drew a fair amount of skepticism, but his ownership of his style remained unapologetic and firm.

He is just 23 runs away from the 10,000-runs mark in Test cricket and is expected to achieve the benchmark in the upcoming Test series against West Indies.

Khan first's major break in international cricket came with his debut Test hundred against Sri Lanka in February 2000 at the Karachi National Stadium.

In the second innings of the match, he scored 107, cementing his place in the team as a strong lower middle-order batsman.

Over the 17-year span of his career, Khan has been a hugely successful batsman. With a Test average of over 50, a triple-hundred, a double-hundred against India in India and a memorable partnership to clinch Pakistan's 3-0 Test whitewash over England, Khan’s career speaks for itself.

Khan also became the only batsman to have scored a century in 11 different countries when he smashed the 34th ton of his career at the Sydney Cricket Ground against Australia in 2016.

One of his major achievements was leading the Pakistani team to win the 2009 T20 World Cup.

While the cricket board would have to work hard to replace Khan, his retirement will bring him closer to pursuing his life-long passion of fishing and spending more time with his family.