Ghani presses Pakistan to open land transit trade from India

Published May 1, 2015
Ghani says if Pakistan does't open the Wagah land transit for Afghan imports from India, his country would take counter measures'—Reuters
Ghani says if Pakistan does't open the Wagah land transit for Afghan imports from India, his country would take counter measures'—Reuters

NEW DELHI: Afghanis­tan’s President Ashraf Ghani has cautioned Pakistan that if it does not open up the Wagah land transit for Afghan imports from India, his country could take counter measures, The Hindu said on Thursday.

Signalling that Afghanis­tan is upset with Pakistan, Mr Ghani told The Hindu: “We will not provide equal transit access to Central Asia [for Pakistani trucks].”

Mr Ghani, who was in India on his first state visit, said that it was a question of “sovereign equality”, and Pakistan must accept the “national treatment” clause agreed to in the Afghanistan Pakistan Transit and Trade Agreement (APTTA), signed in 2011, which gives each country equal access up to the national boundaries of both.

Take a look: New Delhi rendezvous: Ghani reassures India over relationship

At present, Pakistan allows Afghan trucks carrying goods meant for India only up to its last checkpoint at Wagah, and not to the Indian checkpoint at Attari, less than a kilometre away. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said India was keen on a trade agreement with Afghanistan that would include India in the APTTA. On Wednesday, Mr Ghani met leading businessmen, who expressed similar problems with land trade.

Making a strong call for India and the rest of the region to unite against the Islamic State, which he said had challenged countries from “India to Russia”, Mr Ghani said the IS threat was different from that posed by groups such as the Taliban, which wanted to “overthrow the state”.

“Now the prize is not the state, it is destruction. Our territory is being made the battleground. Our people are being killed brutally to show a spectacle. We all need to mobilise as a region,” he said. He denied downplaying the threat from Pakistan-based groups such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan, saying the “drivers have changed”.

Published in Dawn, May 1st, 2015

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