Charlie Hebdo publishes first cover since attack

Published January 13, 2015
Demonstrators hold "Je Suis Charlie" (I am Charlie) signs during a gathering in solidarity with victims of the recent Paris terrorist attacks, at the Plaza de Francia in Panama City, Jan 12, 2015. — AP
Demonstrators hold "Je Suis Charlie" (I am Charlie) signs during a gathering in solidarity with victims of the recent Paris terrorist attacks, at the Plaza de Francia in Panama City, Jan 12, 2015. — AP
A slogan reading "Nous sommes tous Charlie" (We are all Charlie) in Arabic and French has been put on the facade of the Institute of the Arab World (Institut du Monde Arabe, IMA in French) in Paris, on January 12, 2015. — AFP
A slogan reading "Nous sommes tous Charlie" (We are all Charlie) in Arabic and French has been put on the facade of the Institute of the Arab World (Institut du Monde Arabe, IMA in French) in Paris, on January 12, 2015. — AFP
A man in suit wears a "Je Suis Charlie" (I am Charlie) button, during a gathering in solidarity with victims of the recent Paris terrorist attacks, at the Plaza de Francia in Panama City, Jan 12, 2015. — AP
A man in suit wears a "Je Suis Charlie" (I am Charlie) button, during a gathering in solidarity with victims of the recent Paris terrorist attacks, at the Plaza de Francia in Panama City, Jan 12, 2015. — AP

PARIS: The French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is publishing its first issue since extremists killed 12 people at its offices last week.

The newspaper Liberation hosted Charlie Hebdo staff as they prepared the new issue and is handling its special one million-copy print run in numerous languages.

Read: 12 dead in shooting at Paris offices of satirical magazine

Liberation published the Charlie Hebdo cover online late Monday night, ahead of the satirical magazine's publication on Wednesday.

The cartoon shows a bearded man holding a sign reading “Je suis Charlie” (“I am Charlie").

Also read: European leaders to show solidarity with France, attend Paris rally

Overhead was the phrase: “Tout est Pardonne” (“All is Forgiven").

Last week's attack, regarded as the worst terrorist rampage in France in decades, followed Charlie Hebdo's publications carrying what have been widely perceived as caricatures of Prophet Muhammad (Peace be Upon Him).

Some witnesses who were present at Charlie Ebdo's offices at the time of the attack had reported that the attackers at the paper's offices shouted: “We have avenged the prophet.”

Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous.

Opinion

A whiff of hope

A whiff of hope

Despite the old script that has played out in front of us, political events do indicate some changes.

Editorial

Updated 17 May, 2022

Buyer’s remorse

It is strange to hear senior PML-N leaders lamenting the subsidies, yet not even coming up with a subsidy rationalisation plan.
17 May, 2022

Sikh traders’ killing

THE brutal murder of two Sikh traders in the outskirts of Peshawar on Sunday illustrates the vulnerability of...
17 May, 2022

Cholera outbreak

REPORTS of rising cases of cholera and acute watery diarrhoea in several areas are raising the spectre of a public...
Updated 16 May, 2022

Electoral reforms

EARLY elections or not? That is the question. And it seems to be weighing heavy on the mind of everyone in the...
16 May, 2022

Iran deal revival

WHERE the nuclear deal between Iran and the P5+1 is concerned, a great deal of fluidity exists regarding its fate....
16 May, 2022

Deprived of funds

THIS May, Pakistan’s former Fata region will complete its fourth year of merger with Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The...