UK coin study salvages forgotten Roman emperor from ‘obscurity’

Published November 25, 2022
A HANDOUT image provided by the University of Glasgow shows a gold coin with an image depicting Sponsia, a long-forgotten Roman emperor.—AFP
A HANDOUT image provided by the University of Glasgow shows a gold coin with an image depicting Sponsia, a long-forgotten Roman emperor.—AFP

LONDON: A forgotten Roman emperor has been rescued from “obscurity” after UK researchers determined a coin long dismissed as fake was in fact authentic.

The coin featuring the profile of an emperor named Sponsian was among a handful of similar coins found in Transylvania in present-day Romania in 1713.

They had been considered fakes since the mid-19th century due to their jumbled inscriptions and unusual design.

But researchers who studied one of the coins housed at The Hunterian collection at the University of Glasgow in Scotland have now concluded that the coin is genuine after comparison with others with a similar history.

“Scientific analysis of these ultra-rare coins rescues the emperor Sponsian from obscurity,” said lead author Professor Paul Pearson, of University College London.

“Our evidence suggests he ruled Roman Dacia, an isolated gold mining outpost, at a time when the empire was beset by civil wars and the borderlands were overrun by plundering invaders.” The Roman province of Dacia, a territory overlapping with modern-day Romania, was a region prized for its gold mines, according to the study published in the PLOS ONE journal.

It is believed it was cut off from the rest of the Roman empire in around 260 AD with Sponsian, possibly a local army officer, forced into assuming supreme command until order was restored.

The earth science researchers reexamining the coins used powerful microscopes in visible and ultraviolet light to help reach their new verdict.

They believe Sponsian could have authorised the creation of locally produced coins, some featuring an image of his face, to support the economy in his isolated frontier territory. Curator of numismatics at The Hunterian, Jesper Ericsson, said he hoped the study would kickstart interest in this long-lost figure.

Published in Dawn, November 25th, 2022

Opinion

Editorial

Retracted offer
04 Dec, 2022

Retracted offer

WITH so many U-turns under his belt, it was hardly surprising when on Saturday, PTI chairman Imran Khan decided to...
Embassy attack
Updated 04 Dec, 2022

Embassy attack

The Taliban should have enhanced the existing security arrangements.
Smog season
04 Dec, 2022

Smog season

FOR the past week, major cities of Pakistan have been among the top most polluted cities in the world. Lahore ranked...
Fleeting good news
Updated 03 Dec, 2022

Fleeting good news

Indeed, there is no other option to get out of the economic mess we have created in the last few years.
Battle for spoils
03 Dec, 2022

Battle for spoils

THE spectacle playing out inside a London courtroom shines a light on the struggle for control of the assets of the...
CM Bizenjo’s complaint
03 Dec, 2022

CM Bizenjo’s complaint

BALOCHISTAN Chief Minister Mir Abdul Qudoos Bizenjo’s claim that his province is facing a financial crunch due to ...