Prices of bread, bakery items set to go up

Published November 22, 2021
The new rates of medium, small and mini milky bread will be Rs111, Rs76 and Rs51 versus Rs101, Rs66 and Rs46. — File
The new rates of medium, small and mini milky bread will be Rs111, Rs76 and Rs51 versus Rs101, Rs66 and Rs46. — File

KARACHI: Man­ufac­turers in Karachi have decided to give a second price-hike shock of the year to already inflation-hit consumers by increasing prices of bread and other bakery items by 10-12 per cent effective from Nov 26.

As per new price list, the large, medium, small and mini plain bread will be sold at Rs135, Rs110, Rs75 and Rs50 as compared to Rs120, Rs100, Rs65 and Rs45 rates.

The new rates of medium, small and mini milky bread will be Rs111, Rs76 and Rs51 versus Rs101, Rs66 and Rs46.

Consumers will have to pay Rs110 for bran bread as compared to Rs100, while price of cut burger bun (4 pieces) has been raised to Rs70 from Rs60.

The new prices of special burger bun and pillow pack have been fixed at Rs75 and Rs100 as compared to Rs65 and Rs90.

Manufacturers have kept the prices of fruit bun (large), school bun and burger roll unchanged at Rs35, Rs10 and Rs25.

Consumers faced a price jump of 8.5pc to 9pc in April.

In 2019, bread prices went up by over eight per cent ahead of Ramazan followed by another price hike of 9pc ahead of Eidul Azha in the same year.

In July 2020, manufacturers had raised the prices by over 11pc.

The general secretary of the Karachi Bread Association (KBA), Haroon Iqbal Sheikh, confirmed to Dawn on Sunday that the decision to enhance bread prices was taken “in view of rising rates of various materials used in bread making”.

He said super fine flour price had risen to Rs3,750 from Rs3,275 per 50kg bag in April, 2021.

He said wrapping products (poly bags) price had now gone up to Rs720-750 per kg as compared to Rs675 per kg.

Ghee cost Rs322 per kg now as compared to Rs250 in April 2021, while cooking oil was selling at Rs425 as against previous rate of Rs233 per litre.

Sugar price had hit Rs150 per kg recently and but reverted to Rs96 per kg.

Mr Haroon said the losing value of the rupee against the dollar had raised the cost of imported raw material and products like preservatives, improving agents and emulsifiers.

Published in Dawn, November 22nd, 2021

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