Masked Haj pilgrims on Mount Arafat pray for Covid-free world

Published July 19, 2021
Pilgrims practise social distancing as they pray at the Namira Mosque in Arafat during Haj, near the holy city of Makkah, Saudi Arabia, Monday, July 19. — AP
Pilgrims practise social distancing as they pray at the Namira Mosque in Arafat during Haj, near the holy city of Makkah, Saudi Arabia, Monday, July 19. — AP

Thousands of face-masked pilgrims performing this year's Haj gathered on Mount Arafat on Monday to atone for their sins, expressing hopes for peace and an end to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Saudi Arabia, home to Islam's holiest sites in Makkah and Madina, has barred worshippers from abroad for a second year running and has restricted entry from within the kingdom under special conditions to guard against the coronavirus and its new variants.

Only 60,000 Saudi citizens and residents, aged 18 to 65, who have been fully vaccinated or recovered from the virus and do not suffer from chronic diseases, were selected for the pilgrimage, a once-in-a-lifetime duty for every able-bodied Muslim who can afford it.

“It is an indescribable feeling that I got selected among millions of people to attend the Haj. I pray for God to put an end to these hard times the whole world has gone through under the coronavirus,” said Um Ahmed, a Palestinian pilgrim who lives in the Saudi capital Riyadh and who said she lost four family members to the virus.

Muslim pilgrims gather around Mount Arafat during the climax of Haj, on July 19. — AFP
Muslim pilgrims gather around Mount Arafat during the climax of Haj, on July 19. — AFP

In previous years, more than two million pilgrims used to cover Mount Mercy on the plains of Arafat, sitting close to each other in the scorching heat of the desert city, carrying umbrellas and fans to keep cool as temperatures rose towards 40 degrees Celsius.

This year pilgrims, dressed in ihram, had to observe social distancing and wear face masks on Mount Arafat.

“The first prayer is to ask God to lift this pandemic, this curse and this grief for all humanity and for Muslims, so in the next years they are able to attend Haj and for millions to refill these holy sites,” said Maher Baroody, a Syrian pilgrim.

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