British govt’s Covid policy failed the nation, says Johnson’s former adviser

Published May 27, 2021
Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s former top adviser Dominic Cummings waits for a taxi as he leaves the parliament building after giving evidence at a parliamentary committee hearing in London on May 26. The British government “disastrously” failed people by repeatedly mishandling its response to the coronavirus pandemic, ultimately showing Prime Minister Boris Johnson is “unfit for the job”, Cummings told lawmakers on Wednesday. — AFP
Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s former top adviser Dominic Cummings waits for a taxi as he leaves the parliament building after giving evidence at a parliamentary committee hearing in London on May 26. The British government “disastrously” failed people by repeatedly mishandling its response to the coronavirus pandemic, ultimately showing Prime Minister Boris Johnson is “unfit for the job”, Cummings told lawmakers on Wednesday. — AFP

LONDON: The British government “disastrously” failed the public by mishandling the start of the coronavirus pandemic, Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s former top adviser and Brexit architect Dominic Cummings told lawmakers on Wednesday.

In an excoriating account of the crisis’s early days, Cummings — a divisive figure who carved out a uniquely powerful role in Johnson’s government before stepping down in December — said senior ministers and officials “completely failed” to adequately plan.

Covid-19 has claimed nearly 128,000 lives in Britain — the fifth-highest official death toll in the world — while the virus is noted on more than 152,000 UK death certificates, in a sign of its true impact.

Cummings accused Johnson of branding coronavirus “a scare story” and of being too reluctant to impose a lockdown because of the economic impact. He also hit out at Johnson’s leadership, assessing the crisis as a case of “lions led by donkeys over and over again”.

And he repeatedly singled out Health Secretary Matt Hancock for extraordinary criticism, alleging he lied to colleagues on numerous occasions and could have been fired for “at least 15 or 20 things”.

“The truth is that senior ministers, senior officials, senior advisers like me fell disastrously short of the standards that the public has a right to expect of its government in a crisis,” Cummings told a parliamentary committee.

“When the public needed us most the government failed,” he said, adding an apology “to all the families of those who died unnecessarily”.

In response, Johnson told parliament he took “full responsibility” but insisted decision-making during the pandemic had been “appallingly difficult”.

“I maintain my point that the government acted throughout with the intention to save life... in accordance with the best scientific advice.”

The testimony of Cummings, the strategist behind the “Leave” campaign in the 2016 Brexit referendum, was much anticipated after he began attacking Johnson’s coronavirus policies and financial dealings in recent weeks.

During hours of questions from parliament’s health and science scrutiny committees, he conceded “many, many institutions failed around the world” in their initial handling of the pandemic.

But he blasted senior UK officials for failing to grasp the seriousness of the situation.

“Lots of people were literally skiing in the middle of February,” Cummings said.

He accused officials of “catastrophic” group-think, pursuing a haphazard strategy of so-called herd immunity before belatedly abandoning it when the likely death toll became clear.

Cummings said Britain’s top civil servant suggested to Johnson in mid-March that he could encourage gatherings to spread infections and build immunity.

Comparing officials’ eventual realisation of the situation to a scene in the movie “Independence Day” after an alien invasion, Cummings said the deputy cabinet secretary conceded to him that “there is no plan, we’re in huge trouble”.

“The prime minister’s view throughout January, February, March was... the real danger here is not the disease, the real danger here is the measures we take to deal with the disease and the economic destruction that that will cause,” he added.

Cummings was appointed chief adviser by Johnson when he took power in July 2019, helping him to secure a thumping election victory that December. But his frequent clashes with colleagues are said to have led to persistent tensions and he left government a year later.

The 49-year-old was criticised for undermining the government’s lockdown message early in the pandemic when he went on a lengthy cross-country journey with his family.

Published in Dawn, May 27th, 2021

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