Gunmen assassinate two Afghan women judges in Kabul ambush

Published January 17, 2021
In this file photo, Afghan security forces keep watch at the site of a blast in Kabul, Afghanistan. — Reuters
In this file photo, Afghan security forces keep watch at the site of a blast in Kabul, Afghanistan. — Reuters

Gunmen shot dead two Afghan women judges working for the Supreme Court during an early morning ambush in the country's capital on Sunday, officials said, as a wave of assassinations continues to rattle the nation.

Violence has surged across Afghanistan in recent months despite ongoing peace talks between the Taliban and government — especially in Kabul, where a new trend of targeted killings aimed at high-profile figures has sown fear in the restive city.

The latest attack comes just two days after the Pentagon announced it had cut troop levels in Afghanistan to 2,500, the fewest in nearly two decades.

The attack on the judges happened as they were driving to their office in a court vehicle, said Ahmad Fahim Qaweem, a spokesman for the Supreme Court.

“Unfortunately, we have lost two women judges in today's attack. Their driver is wounded,” Qaweem told AFP.

There are more than 200 female judges working for the country's top court, the spokesman added.

Kabul police confirmed the attack.

Afghanistan's Supreme Court was a target in February 2017 when a suicide bomb ripped through a crowd of court employees, killing at least 20 and wounding 41.

In recent months, several prominent Afghans — including politicians, journalists, activists, doctors and prosecutors — have been assassinated in often brazen daytime attacks in Kabul and other cities.

Afghan officials have blamed the Taliban for the attacks, a charge the insurgent group has denied. Some of these killings have been claimed by the rival jihadist Islamic State group.

Earlier this month, the US military for the first time directly accused the Taliban of orchestrating the attacks.

“The Taliban's campaign of unclaimed attacks and targeted killings of government officials, civil society leaders & journalists must [...] cease for peace to succeed,” Colonel Sonny Leggett, spokesman for US forces in Afghanistan, said on Twitter.

The targeted killings have surged despite the Taliban and Afghan government engaging in peace talks in the Qatari capital of Doha.

The Taliban carried out more than 18,000 attacks in 2020, Afghanistan's spy chief Ahmad Zia Siraj told lawmakers earlier this month.

On Friday, the Pentagon announced it had cut troop levels in Afghanistan to 2,500 as part of its deal with the Taliban to withdraw all troops from the country by May 2021.

That deal was struck in return for security guarantees from the insurgents and a commitment to peace talks with the Afghan government.

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