Physical remand of 3 suspects in Nashwa case extended

Updated April 25, 2019

Email

Nursing in charge Atif Javed, administration officer Ahmed Shahzad and security in charge Waleed are in police custody. — AFP/File
Nursing in charge Atif Javed, administration officer Ahmed Shahzad and security in charge Waleed are in police custody. — AFP/File

A judicial magistrate on Thursday extended by three days the physical remand of three hospital officials who were arrested over the death of infant Nashwa in a Karachi hospital this week allegedly due to receiving a "wrong injection".

The court granted police an extension in the remand for Nursing In-Charge Atif Javed, Administration Officer Ahmed Shahzad and Security In-Charge Waleed. A fourth suspect, Dr Sobia, was also arrested in relation with the case.

Infant Nashwa was left paralysed earlier this month after she was allegedly injected with the wrong dosage of a solution at the hospital. According to a report by the Sindh Health Care Commission, the nine-month-old had been administered with an overdose of potassium chloride and that too not via a drip at the Darul Sehat hospital.

A first information report registered by Ali on April 15 stated that on April 6, he had taken his twins to the hospital for treatment of diarrhoea.

On April 7, one of the two children, identified as Nashwa, was allegedly administered an overdose of potassium chloride and that too not via a drip, the FIR said. Minutes later, her lips turned blue and she began having trouble breathing.

She was shifted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and administered cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for 45 minutes, after which her breathing function was restored, and then placed on a ventilator.

On April 12, when Nashwa was taken off the ventilator, doctors informed the father that she "may have suffered a brain injury" due to lack of oxygen supply to the brain that might have been a result of CPR performed on her for 45 minutes.

The FIR stated that a subsequent CT scan revealed that due to lack of oxygen to the brain, the child’s hands, feet, eyes and mouth had been paralysed.

She was later shifted to Liaquat National Hospital (LNH) for further treatment, where she fought for her life for a week before passing away early on Monday.