Nayar’s relative scatters his ashes in Ravi

Published October 6, 2018
LAHORE: A relative of the late Indian journalist Kuldip Nayar drops his ashes in the Ravi on Friday.—Aun Jafri / White Star
LAHORE: A relative of the late Indian journalist Kuldip Nayar drops his ashes in the Ravi on Friday.—Aun Jafri / White Star

LAHORE: Mandira Nayar, a granddaughter of famous Indian journalist Kuldip Nayar, on Friday scattered his ashes in the Ravi in keeping with his will.

After scattering the ashes in the river, she told media personnel that she had joined journalism only to continue her grandfather’s mission of “people-to-people contact and peace” in the region, especially between Pakistan and India.

She later visited the Lahore Press Club where honorary membership of the club was bestowed on her. After her grandfather, she became the second Indian to be given the honour.

“My grandfather was not a member of the New Delhi Press Club, but of the Lahore Press Club. Although he lived in Delhi, he was spiritually part of Lahore. His will to scatter his remains in the Ravi at Lahore is a testimony to his spiritual connection to the place,” said Mandira Nayar.

“The late journalist lit the candle of peace and it will be kept burning,” she added.

Earlier, speaking about the well-known Indian journalist, I.A. Rehman said he still remembered the day when Mr Nayar visited the press club for the first time.

“The club was packed to capacity as a large number of journalists visited it to welcome him. He was one of the founding members of the peace initiative in the region, especially between Pakistan and India,” he said.

He said the late journalist was born in Sialkot, “studied here and practised law here briefly”. “He was a true peacenik who would be remembered for long.”

Imtiaz Alam, the secretary general of the South Asia Free Media Association, was of the view that peace movements needed people like Mr Nayar because they had the capacity and courage to lead from the front and stay committed to the cause.

He certainly was one of the biggest exponents of people-to-people contact because he believed that it could promote peace. For years, he was a regular visitor to the Wagah border crossing — from the Indian side — to lead and reciprocate peace overtures from the other side of the border.

“All those he inspired will follow in his footsteps, promote peace and keep the hopes of regional peace alive,” said Mr Alam.

Kuldip Nayar passed away on Aug 23.

Published in Dawn, October 6th, 2018

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