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Suu Kyi to skip UN session to deal with Rohingya crisis

September 14, 2017
NEW DELHI: Demonstrators shout slogans during a protest against the persecution of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar as they try to march on Myanmar’s embassy here on Wednesday.—AFP
NEW DELHI: Demonstrators shout slogans during a protest against the persecution of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar as they try to march on Myanmar’s embassy here on Wednesday.—AFP

YANGON: Myanmar’s national leader Aung San Suu Kyi, facing outrage over violence that has forced about 400,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee to Bangla­desh, cancelled a trip to the upcoming UN General Assembly session because of the crisis, her office said on Wednesday.

The exodus of refugees, sparked by the security forces’ fierce response to a series of Rohingya militant attacks, is the most pressing problem Suu Kyi has faced since becoming leader last year.

Critics have called for her to be stripped of her Nobel peace prize for failing to do more to halt the strife which the UN rights agency said was a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing”.

Aid agencies would have to step up operations “massively” in response to the refugee flow to Bangladesh, a senior UN official said, adding that the $77 million the United Nations had appealed for last week would not be enough.

But a Bangladeshi border force officer said the number of people crossing into his area had fallen sharply, apparently because everyone had left the districts worst hit by violence.

Suu Kyi, in her first address to the UN General Assembly as leader in Sep­tember last year, defended her government’s efforts to resolve the crisis over treatment of the Muslim minority.

This year, she cancelled her trip to New York because of the security threats posed by the militants and the need to restore stability, Zaw Htay, spokesman for Suu Kyi’s office, told a media briefing.

“She is concentrating on establishing stability,” the spokesman said, adding that preventing any spread of communal violence was a priority and Suu Kyi would address the nation on reconciliation and peace next Tuesday.

International pressure has been growing on Budd­hist-majority Myan­mar to end the violence in the western state of Rakhine that began on Aug 25 when Rohingya militants attacked 30 police posts and an army camp.

The raids triggered a military counteroffensive against the militants, whom the government labels terrorists. Refugees say the offensive is aimed at pushing Rohingya out of Myanmar.

Published in Dawn, September 14th, 2017