China begins push for Pak-Afghan detente

Published June 25, 2017
ISLAMABAD: Adviser to the PM on Foreign Affairs Sartaj Aziz, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and members of their teams pictured during a meeting on Saturday.—APP
ISLAMABAD: Adviser to the PM on Foreign Affairs Sartaj Aziz, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and members of their teams pictured during a meeting on Saturday.—APP

ISLAMABAD: China on Saturday began its efforts to normalise relations bet­ween Pakistan and Afgha­nistan and encourage cooperation between the two countries for a political settlement of the Afghan conflict.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi reached Islamabad in the evening after visiting Kabul during the day where he held talks with Afghan Foreign Minister Salahud­din Rabbani and National Security Adviser Haneef Atmar.

The Chinese minister, who was received at the airport by Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif, started his visit with talks at the Foreign Office with Foreign Affairs Adviser Sartaj Aziz.

According to sources, the discussions centred around the situation in Afghanistan and the relations between Pakistan and Afghanistan that have been on a steep downslide due to differences over the strategy to fight terrorism.

China, the sources said, was proposing a trilateral mechanism for cooperation for peace and reconciliation in Afghanistan and coordination of counterterrorism actions between Pakistan and Afghanistan.

An announcement in this regard is expected on Sunday.

Mr Wang’s visit is a follow-up to the discussions the Chinese leadership had with Pakistani and Afghan leaders on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation summit earlier this month on counterterrorism cooperation and revival of the Afghan peace process.

The Chinese minister will also meet Chief of the Army Staff Gen Qamar Bajwa.

China has lately got increasingly involved in Afghanistan. Besides its bilateral engagement with both Islamabad and Kabul, it is part of a number of international processes on Afghanistan.

Beijing’s interest in Afghanistan is out of its security concerns related to presence of Uighur militants in Badakhshan province. Moreover, China’s regional engagement is driven by its economic investment in Afghanistan and the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.

For Beijing, peace and stability in Afghanistan is critical for both its own security and investments in Pakistan.

Published in Dawn, June 25th, 2017

Opinion

Sub judice rule
18 Sep 2021

Sub judice rule

It is time this objection, sub judice, is laid to rest.
The Black Caps folly
Updated 18 Sep 2021

The Black Caps folly

There is so much wrong — and worrying — about the entire sorry episode of New Zealand backing out of Pakistan tour.
CT NAP revisited
Updated 18 Sep 2021

CT NAP revisited

A policy of appeasement towards extremists has undermined the state’s writ.
Pathways for reform
Updated 17 Sep 2021

Pathways for reform

Even now the government has said they are listening, but they have not said how they are listening.

Editorial

Blinken’s remarks
Updated 18 Sep 2021

Blinken’s remarks

The US establishment cannot scapegoat Pakistan for two decades of bad policy in Afghanistan.
18 Sep 2021

Worrying survey

THE findings of the Labour Force Survey 2018-19 indicate that some important headline trends have already taken or...
18 Sep 2021

Special needs

THE fact that only 3,653 children with special needs, out of some 300,000 in Sindh, are registered with the...
TTP amnesty?
Updated 17 Sep 2021

TTP amnesty?

An amnesty should be for some individuals, not the entire outfit.
17 Sep 2021

Media regulation

THE needless controversy over media regulation may finally be heading for a resolution. In a meeting with ...
17 Sep 2021

Refusing audit

THE continuous resistance put up by several public-sector organisations to submitting their accounts for audit by ...