Valentine’s Day, a moneymaking opportunity nonetheless

Published February 13, 2016
A woman vendor sells  balloons in connection with Valentine's Day celebrations in Lahore. —Online
A woman vendor sells balloons in connection with Valentine's Day celebrations in Lahore. —Online
Man seen filling gas in heart shaped balloon at a roadside in Karachi. —Online
Man seen filling gas in heart shaped balloon at a roadside in Karachi. —Online
Vendors displayed flowers to attract customers in Lahore. —Online
Vendors displayed flowers to attract customers in Lahore. —Online
Students chant slogans against valentine celebrations 
during protest in Karachi. —PPI
Students chant slogans against valentine celebrations during protest in Karachi. —PPI
Woman seen buying card at a shop in Multan.—Online
Woman seen buying card at a shop in Multan.—Online
Vendors prepare stalls at flower market in connection with Valentine's Day. —Online
Vendors prepare stalls at flower market in connection with Valentine's Day. —Online
Demonstrators hold posters as they take part in a protest against Valentine's Day in Karachi. —AFP
Demonstrators hold posters as they take part in a protest against Valentine's Day in Karachi. —AFP
A woman visits a gift shop in Peshawar ahead of Valentine's Day. —AFP
A woman visits a gift shop in Peshawar ahead of Valentine's Day. —AFP
A girl buying a bouquet of flowers in Faisalabad. —Online
A girl buying a bouquet of flowers in Faisalabad. —Online
A vendor arranges heart-shaped balloons along the roadside to attract customers. —AP
A vendor arranges heart-shaped balloons along the roadside to attract customers. —AP
A shopkeeper prepares a gift at a shop ahead of Valentine's Day in Peshawar. —AFP
A shopkeeper prepares a gift at a shop ahead of Valentine's Day in Peshawar. —AFP

Every year Valentine's Day draws a mixed response from people, with some supporting it and others celebrating it but a few protesting against its observance.

This year seems no different, as on one hand people are excited about the day while some are staging protests and moving the court against it.

But amid all this, the people who benefit nonetheless are the shopkeepers and vendors. Hawkers selling heart-shaped balloons stake out street corners and florists do a brisk trade.

Despite it is termed a Christian holiday, Valentine's Day has gained popularity among Pakistanis, with flower vendors reporting booming sales this year, as in recent years.

However, in Peshawar, members of the district assembly on Friday had unanimously passed a resolution to ban Valentine's Day celebrations.

“A particular segment of our society wants to impose Western values and culture on our youth by celebrating Valentine's Day,” said the resolution, which was presented by a member of Jamaat-i-Islami.

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