THE National Testing Service, as the name implies, is a testing system introduced by the Musharraf regime primarily for grants of scholarships to students who intended to get higher education abroad.

With the passage of time it has become an organisation to be hired to conduct admission tests for different institutes/colleges of the country.

Nearly every month it conducts one or two tests.

The fee for appearing in the test ranges from Rs500 to Rs700, besides bank and dispatch charges. Nearly 40,000 to 50,000 candidates appear in these examinations.

Its existence is justified for the only reason that it conducts tests (GAT) for scholarships after graduation or tests for entrance to a professional institute after the higher secondary school level.

Making tests mandatory for those who want to get higher education (MS or PhD) in Pakistan — and that too at their own expenses —has no grounds for arranging such tests through NTS.

However if the HEC is still reluctant to accept this, it should announce that no examinations will be held at the graduate level.

The NTS should be authorised to hold the final examination instead of the relevant university or college.

Is it not a strange step that a student first appears in examinations at the graduate level and after successful completion of the graduate study, he again has to appear in the NTS examination?

This shows that the HEC does not trust examinations at university or college level. If this is true, the HEC should abandon these examinations.

This way the precious time of teachers, as well as the expenses incurred by students on these examinations, will be saved. The students will need not pass the same examinations twice.

However if the NTS held the examination only for the scholarship, then it surely justifies to hold the examination after graduation.

The HEC should encourage universities/colleges to hold separate examinations for students who want to pursue studies at their own cost.

Moreover, the paper prepared through the NTS contains questions that do not commonly form the contents of the syllabus taught at most universities.

If corrective steps are not taken, the present practice will only add misery to the problems of the students.

WALI M AFRIDI
Peshawar

Opinion

Editorial

17 Jan, 2022

Security policy unveiled

PAKISTAN’S freshly unveiled National Security Policy has broadened the traditional concept and included economic...
Bold decisions
Updated 17 Jan, 2022

Bold decisions

IT is a double blow within a matter of days. The Islamabad High Court’s order last week to demolish a navy golf...
17 Jan, 2022

Rohingya camp blaze

A HUGE blaze in a refugee camp housing members of the Rohingya community in Bangladesh last week has left up to ...
16 Jan, 2022

Omicron threat

AS Pakistan grapples with the fifth coronavirus wave fuelled by the Omicron variant, the state must take timely...
Updated 16 Jan, 2022

Grim picture

There is much the govt can do to create an environment free of repression and coercion so that democracy is strengthened.
16 Jan, 2022

Larkana jail unrest

THAT Larkana Central Prison authorities had to resort to the excuse of “cleaning the jail” to shift 13 dangerous...