The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, in New York, is rolling out an exhibition on cricket and baseball. "Swinging Away: How Cricket and Baseball Connect" begins a 10-month run on Sunday, April 17. It is the first major exhibition dedicated to exploring the roots of both bat-and-ball sports and their ensuing relationship. – Photos by AP

A belt-buckle circa 1868 that depicts English cricketers and worn by New York Knickerbockers baseball player Napoleon Bonaparte MacLaughlin, is seen in this picture.
A belt-buckle circa 1868 that depicts English cricketers and worn by New York Knickerbockers baseball player Napoleon Bonaparte MacLaughlin, is seen in this picture.
Senior Curator Tom Shieber poses with uniforms worn by a cricket wicketkeeper, left, and a baseball catcher.
Senior Curator Tom Shieber poses with uniforms worn by a cricket wicketkeeper, left, and a baseball catcher.
Tom Shieber poses with the oldest-known cricket uniform from circa 1820.
Tom Shieber poses with the oldest-known cricket uniform from circa 1820.
This photo shows a pair of ceramic figures representing All-England Eleven cricketers George Parr and Julius Caesar.
This photo shows a pair of ceramic figures representing All-England Eleven cricketers George Parr and Julius Caesar.
This photo shows a baseball painting, left, and a cricket painting on display at the exhibition.
This photo shows a baseball painting, left, and a cricket painting on display at the exhibition.
A blue cricket ball from 1897 is on display at the exhibition.
A blue cricket ball from 1897 is on display at the exhibition.
Tom Shieber poses with a test cricket batting form used by Andrew Flintoff.
Tom Shieber poses with a test cricket batting form used by Andrew Flintoff.
Trophy cricket balls from American cricketer Bart King is part of the exhibition.
Trophy cricket balls from American cricketer Bart King is part of the exhibition.
A cricket bat from the Gentlemen of Philadelphia and the Young America Cricket Club is seen in the museum.
A cricket bat from the Gentlemen of Philadelphia and the Young America Cricket Club is seen in the museum.

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Comments (3) Closed

GKrishnan
Apr 18, 2011 07:08pm
It was the inimitable George Bernard Shaw, whose writings and thoughts should have relevance for our sub-continent today more than ever before, who said that " baseball has the advantage over cricket of being sooner-ended ". That is no longer true, thanks to the abbreviated form of the game today, reduced to a ludicrous 20-20.
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Jawwad
Apr 18, 2011 08:19pm
Amazing stuff. It's really epic to see the history of the game andit's relation to the sister game of Baseball.
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Sarwar
Apr 18, 2011 08:25pm
Once you get a hand on the game of cricket, baseball will than become a walk in the park for you.
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