MUZAFFARABAD, July 27: A Kashmiri group claimed responsibility on Saturday for three political killings in the past week and threatened to kill anyone who takes part in elections in occupied Kashmir.

Jamiat-ul-Mujahideen, one of the two groups India banned in April under controversial anti-terror laws, said it had shot dead three members of disputed Kashmir’s ruling party, National Conference, on Thursday.

The killings, on the eve of a new peace mission to South Asia by US Secretary of State Colin Powell, brought to more than 10, the number of National Conference members the group claims to have killed in the past six week. In making the claim, a spokesman for the group told Reuters all active participants in elections due by mid-October in occupied Kashmir were now targets.

“Any person, who as a candidate, or as a voter or supporter or as a transporter, takes part or assists in the elections willingly, will be deemed a traitor and meet an exemplary fate.

“No person will escape his fate who betrays the blood of 80,000 martyrs in Kashmir, or who tramples over the feelings of the Kashmiri people by participating in the elections.”

Earlier in July the United Jihad Council, the main anti-India alliance, of which Jamiat-ul-Mujahideen is a member, urged freedom fighters in occupied Kashmir to start an anti-poll campaign and warned election supporters of dire consequences.

But Jamiat-ul-Mujahideen’s statement was the first to make a direct threat to all involved in the election process.

The group said people should boycott the elections, which would be “a fraud intended to deceive world opinion”.

The spokesman said his group had formed a special guerrilla force named Al Jabbar to target people actively involved in the election. “We will not touch those supporters of the pro-election parties who either are not taking part in any election process or stay away from such a process,” he said.

The spokesman said the prime targets would be supporters of National Conference actively engaged in the election. The statement came a day before Colin Powell was due to hold talks with both India and Pakistan in which he says he will push for talks on Kashmir.—Reuters

Opinion

Gaming LNG
Updated 05 Aug 2021

Gaming LNG

What looked like rank incompetence about a year ago is now beginning to smack of malfeasance.
Healing the spirit
05 Aug 2021

Healing the spirit

ROC medal winners could not hear their national anthem being played.
Returning to a repressive order
Updated 04 Aug 2021

Returning to a repressive order

There is no sign of the Taliban showing any flexibility in their position and taking a more moderate stance.

Editorial

A tragic anniversary
Updated 05 Aug 2021

A tragic anniversary

Attempts to change IOK's demography should end and India must open channels with the genuine Kashmiri leadership.
05 Aug 2021

Currency pressure

THE increasing demand for dollars in the wake of surging imports and debt repayments has put significant pressure on...
05 Aug 2021

Protecting breastfeeding

A LOT has been said about the fact that 40pc of children under five years in Pakistan are stunted. The reasons...
PML-N’s dilemma
Updated 04 Aug 2021

PML-N’s dilemma

The road ahead for the PML-N is going to be long and bumpy no matter which narrative it follows.
04 Aug 2021

Attacks on cops

AMIDST cautious optimism that Pakistan may be finally beginning to achieve success in bringing the number of polio...
04 Aug 2021

Myanmar about-face

SIX months into the coup that sent Myanmar’s hybrid civ-mil government packing, the generals have made their...