Fusako Shigenobu
Fusako Shigenobu

TOKYO: Fusako Shige­nobu, the 76-year-old female founder of the once-feared Japanese Red Army, wal­ked free from prison on Saturday after completing a 20-year sentence for a 1974 embassy siege.

Shigenobu was one of the world’s most notorious wom­en during the 1970s and 1980s, when her radical leftist group carried out armed attacks worldwide in support of the Palestinian cause.

She left the prison in Tokyo in a black car with her daughter as several supporters held a banner saying: “We love Fusako”.

“I apologise for the inconvenience my arrest has cau­sed to so many people,” Shig­e­nobu told reporters after the release. “It’s half a century ago... but we caused dam­age to innocent people who were strangers to us by prioritising our battle, such as by hostage-taking,” she said.

76-year-old woman says she will now focus on her cancer treatment, will continue to reflect on her past

The former soy-sauce company worker is believed to have masterminded the 1972 machine gun and grenade attack on Tel Aviv’s Lod Airport, which left 26 people dead and injured about 80. She was arrested in Japan in 2000 and sentenced to two decades behind bars six years later for her part in a siege of the French embassy in the Netherlands. She had lived as a fugitive in the Middle East for around 30 years before resurfacing in Japan.

Her daughter, May, born in 1973 to a father from the militant Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), hailed her mother’s release on social media.

Shigenobu maintained her innocence over the siege, in which three Red Army militants stormed into the French embassy, taking the ambassador and 10 other staff hostage for 100 hours. Two police officers were shot and seriously wounded. France ended the standoff by freeing a jailed Red Army guerilla, who flew off with the hostage-takers in a plane to Syria.

She did not take part in the attack personally but the court said she coordinated the operation with the PFLP.

Shigenobu was the daughter of a World War II major who became a grocer after Japan’s defeat. Her odyssey into extremism began by accident when she pas­s­ed a sit-in protest at a Tokyo university when she was 20.

As Japan was in the midst of campus tumult in the 1960s and 70s to protest the Viet­nam War, she quickly became involved in the leftist movement and left Japan at the age of 25.

She announced the Red Army’s disbanding from pri­son in April 2001, and in 2008 was diagnosed with colon and intestinal cancer, undergoing several operations.

On Saturday, Shigenobu said she would first focus on her treatment and explai­ned she would not be able to “contribute to the society” given her frail condition. But she added: “I want to continue to reflect (on my past) and live more and more with curiosity.”

Published in Dawn, May 29th, 2022

Opinion

Editorial

Skyrocketing prices
Updated 03 Jul, 2022

Skyrocketing prices

Some sellers are seeking to take advantage of the prevailing disorder by creating artificial shortages or jacking up prices.
Flooding alert
03 Jul, 2022

Flooding alert

THE Gilgit-Baltistan government has issued an alert about the possible flooding of areas along river banks and...
Assaulting journalists
03 Jul, 2022

Assaulting journalists

ANOTHER day, another citizen roughed up for speaking his mind. The assault on veteran journalist Ayaz Amir by...
Uncertainty remains in Punjab
Updated 02 Jul, 2022

Uncertainty remains in Punjab

With the latest verdict, the judiciary seems to have unintentionally entered the political arena, which is not desirable.
Turbulence in tech
02 Jul, 2022

Turbulence in tech

THE party seems to have cooled considerably for the Pakistani start-up scene. With some of the world’s biggest...
Environmental cost
02 Jul, 2022

Environmental cost

THE collective impact of climate-disaster-health hazards are already taking a huge toll on Pakistan’s fragile...