Migrant workers being moved to safe places in occupied Kashmir

Published October 19, 2021
Indian migrant workers wait with their belongings inside a railway station to board trains to their home states following attacks on migrant labourers in occupied Kashmir, on the outskirts of Srinagar, October 18. — Reuters
Indian migrant workers wait with their belongings inside a railway station to board trains to their home states following attacks on migrant labourers in occupied Kashmir, on the outskirts of Srinagar, October 18. — Reuters

SRINAGAR: Indian authorities have started moving thousands of migrant workers in occupied Kashmir to safe locations overnight, while hundreds have fled the valley after a wave of targeted killings, two officials said on Monday.

Kashmiri fighters have killed 11 civilians, including five migrant workers, in held Kashmir since Oct 6 despite a widespread crackdown in the heavily militarised region.

“We moved thousands of workers to secure places and are facilitating their return home,” a senior police official said.

Explainer: What is behind the recent surge in violence in Indian-occupied Kashmir?

In other areas, Indian forces had intensified patrolling to prevent any militant activity, the official added.

A government spokesman in Srinagar declined to comment on the movement of migrant workers.

The decision to move workers came after an attack on migrant labourers from Bihar on Sunday. Police said assailants barged into a rented room in Kulgam district and fired at them, leaving two dead and one wounded.

The India-occupied region has gone through bouts of violence over the years, but the latest wave of attacks appears to be targeted towards non-Kashmiris, including migrant workers, and members of the Hindu and Sikh communities.

Some of them said they now fear for their lives.

“We have seen worse times, but were never targeted. This time, we are afraid,” said 32-year old Mohammed Salam, who has worked in held Kashmir for the last six years.

Published in Dawn, October 19th, 2021

Opinion

A velvet glove

A velvet glove

The general didn’t have an easy task when he took over, but in retrospect, he managed it rather well.

Editorial

Updated 24 May, 2022

Marching in May

MORE unrest. That is the forecast for the weeks ahead as the PTI formally proceeds with its planned march on...
24 May, 2022

Policy rate hike

THE State Bank has raised its policy rate by 150bps to 13.75pc, hoping that its latest monetary-tightening action...
24 May, 2022

Questionable campaign

OVER the past couple of days, a number of cases have been registered in different parts of the country against...
23 May, 2022

Defection rulings

By setting aside the existing law to prescribe their own solutions, the institutions haven't really solved the crisis at hand.
23 May, 2022

Spirit of the law

WOMEN’S right to inheritance is often galling for their male relatives in our patriarchal society. However, with...
23 May, 2022

Blaming others

BLAMING the nebulous ‘foreign hand’ for creating trouble within our borders is an age-old method used by the...