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Looking to the stars

The Karachi Astronomers Society are an astronomical society formed between 2008 and 2009, based in Karachi and run completely by enthusiasts. Its aim is to promote astronomy and to bring it back from its relative obscurity in the country. The society has over 1000 members; most of whom very actively promote and pursue astronomy within their own means. It also owns some of Pakistan's largest and most advanced telescopes; which are used on their monthly astronomy trips to different locations near Karachi, as well as in their public sessions.

The stars serve as a perfect backdrop to this picture of team Karachi Astronomers Society at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
The stars serve as a perfect backdrop to this picture of team Karachi Astronomers Society at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Some participants prefer to observe, while others celebrate, as the Moon emerges from below the horizon during the night at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Some participants prefer to observe, while others celebrate, as the Moon emerges from below the horizon during the night at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
A photograph taken during one of the society’s dark-sky trips or "Rutjugas" at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
A photograph taken during one of the society’s dark-sky trips or "Rutjugas" at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Located away from the city, the location of Lake Kalri provided minimal interference from light and dust pollution, allowing the sky to be seen in all its splendor. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Located away from the city, the location of Lake Kalri provided minimal interference from light and dust pollution, allowing the sky to be seen in all its splendor. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
The clear night sky at Lake Kalri allows enthusiasts to gaze at a view of the sky that can never be seen in the cities. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
The clear night sky at Lake Kalri allows enthusiasts to gaze at a view of the sky that can never be seen in the cities. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Members of Karachi Astronomers Society pose in this picture against the backdrop of the starry sky. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Members of Karachi Astronomers Society pose in this picture against the backdrop of the starry sky. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Planets appear as stars to the naked eye, this shot shows the largest of our solar system’s planets, Jupiter on a cold night at Mirpur Sakro. Using a small telescope one can even see the four largest of Jupiter's moons. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Planets appear as stars to the naked eye, this shot shows the largest of our solar system’s planets, Jupiter on a cold night at Mirpur Sakro. Using a small telescope one can even see the four largest of Jupiter's moons. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
This picture shows the dimmer arms of the Milky Way overhead, on a cold and peaceful night at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
This picture shows the dimmer arms of the Milky Way overhead, on a cold and peaceful night at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
A participant poses against a starry backdrop showing the Andromeda Galaxy (Left) and the subtle, dim Milky Way (Center). Both galaxies are on a collision course over the next few billion years. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
A participant poses against a starry backdrop showing the Andromeda Galaxy (Left) and the subtle, dim Milky Way (Center). Both galaxies are on a collision course over the next few billion years. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Who says astronomy is only reserved for night-time? The Sun is the closest star to us  and makes for an intriguing and fun subject itself.
(Never view the Sun directly with your eyes or with a telescope without proper protection) – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Who says astronomy is only reserved for night-time? The Sun is the closest star to us and makes for an intriguing and fun subject itself. (Never view the Sun directly with your eyes or with a telescope without proper protection) – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
he view of one of Karachi Astronomers Society’s camps near Thatta, about 200 km east of Karachi. With a sky clear as this, even faint satellites become as visible as stars - one can be seen making a trail overhead in this long exposure photograph. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
he view of one of Karachi Astronomers Society’s camps near Thatta, about 200 km east of Karachi. With a sky clear as this, even faint satellites become as visible as stars - one can be seen making a trail overhead in this long exposure photograph. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
This beautiful view contains several objects of particular interest to astronomers. The faint Milky Way band (Left), the Orion Nebula, the birthplace of stars (Center Right), the brightest and one of the closest stars to our sun, Sirius (bottom Left) and Betelgeuse, the bright red-giant star that is about to burst into a supernova (Center Top). – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
This beautiful view contains several objects of particular interest to astronomers. The faint Milky Way band (Left), the Orion Nebula, the birthplace of stars (Center Right), the brightest and one of the closest stars to our sun, Sirius (bottom Left) and Betelgeuse, the bright red-giant star that is about to burst into a supernova (Center Top). – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
One doesn't even need to lift their head and look up to witness the starry skies; views like this convey the calmness of the location beautifully. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
One doesn't even need to lift their head and look up to witness the starry skies; views like this convey the calmness of the location beautifully. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
The famous constellation of Orion and it's reflection in the water. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
The famous constellation of Orion and it's reflection in the water. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
About an hour before sun rise, the participants witnessed what they had come for - the brightest portions called Sagittarius and Scorpius of the galaxy of Milky Way finally became visible as an overwhelming arc extending from the horizon towards the zenith, at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
About an hour before sun rise, the participants witnessed what they had come for - the brightest portions called Sagittarius and Scorpius of the galaxy of Milky Way finally became visible as an overwhelming arc extending from the horizon towards the zenith, at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Nebulae are bright, gaseous regions where stars are born. Orion Nebula, due to being visible to the naked eye from the city as well as it's close proximity to Earth is the most well-known and studied of these objects. – Photo by Abubaker Siddiq
Nebulae are bright, gaseous regions where stars are born. Orion Nebula, due to being visible to the naked eye from the city as well as it's close proximity to Earth is the most well-known and studied of these objects. – Photo by Abubaker Siddiq
An enthusiast sets up camp beneath the starry sky at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Tausif Muhammad
An enthusiast sets up camp beneath the starry sky at Lake Kalri. – Photo by Tausif Muhammad
The brightest star on the left is Planet Venus in one of its closest apparitions, seen above is the arc of our home, the Milky Way galaxy, at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Tausif Muhammad
The brightest star on the left is Planet Venus in one of its closest apparitions, seen above is the arc of our home, the Milky Way galaxy, at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Tausif Muhammad
A crop farm provided the astronomers a place to spend the night on their outing at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
A crop farm provided the astronomers a place to spend the night on their outing at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Telescopes are literally the center pieces on these trips, what better place to exchange knowledge and discuss ideas than around one? – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Telescopes are literally the center pieces on these trips, what better place to exchange knowledge and discuss ideas than around one? – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Participants pose with members of the Karachi Astronomers Society at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi
Participants pose with members of the Karachi Astronomers Society at Mirpur Sakro. – Photo by Ramiz Qureshi

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Comments (13) Closed



Muhammad Atif Apr 17, 2014 12:31am

Beautiful images.

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Nasir Khan Apr 17, 2014 02:07am

Love to see all these people out there in pursuit of something educational and aesthetic. Kind of make you wonder how small human being is and how short this life is, why make a fuss?

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Ashher Apr 17, 2014 05:42am

Lovely pcitures, welldone to Karachi Astronomers Society. I am far away from home land and very excited to go on a star gazzing trip this weekend

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Indian Apr 17, 2014 09:31am

Oh my God!! Such beauuutiful images... :)

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RM Apr 17, 2014 10:19am

Apart from some really beautiful pictures, it good to know such society exists here in Karachi. It will definitely promote astronomy in generations to come. Keep the good work!

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Adil Apr 17, 2014 11:20am

There is a lot of difference between astronomers and a bunch of guys taking pictures of the night sky!

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Aman Apr 17, 2014 02:04pm

Wonderful to see this. This is what I want..Keep it up (May Pakistan be 1st in science and logic and last in fundamentalism)..once in my life, I want to visit Takshilla and Indus civilization and eat some of the best kebabs in Lahore freely as a Hindu with pack of Pakistani friends. I hope that day is coming...

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Ramiz Apr 17, 2014 04:19pm

@Adil: True. If you go to our FB page you'd come to know of our public presentations, workshops, telescopic viewing sessions and educational blogs as well. You're welcome to participate in them.

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chikoo Apr 17, 2014 06:08pm

Oh my days!! i am really really honored to say you people , you have carried out such a fabulous job. snaps really got my all attention to them seriously amazing keep it up, hey guys can i follow your pages on facebook ?

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Sarthak Apr 18, 2014 11:50am

@Ramiz: You are doing something nice and important. Keep it up. The pics are awesome.

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Ramiz Apr 18, 2014 03:17pm

@Sarthak: Thank you Sarthak but it's the whole society. Just regular folks who're putting in effort to take astronomy to the heights it deserves to be at :)

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Zain Ahmed Apr 18, 2014 06:29pm

@chikoo: You sure can: facebook.com/SahalTelescopes, facebook.com/KarachiAstronomy, facebook.com/KaAStrodome and facebook.com/groups/LahoreAstronomy

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talha Apr 19, 2014 10:23am

i wanst expecting this was from Pakistan superb and brillant effort by astros

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