US President Barack Obama announced the death of al Qaeda’s elusive leader Osama bin Laden on Monday. Bin Laden was reportedly killed in a firefight with US forces in Pakistan in a house outside Islamabad on Sunday. Osama’s body was recovered, Obama said. Osama was the mastermind of the September 11, 2001 attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people in the United States.

Those attacks led to the invasion of Afghanistan, a subsequent war and occupation of Iraq and drone attacks inside Pakistani territory. The Afghan conflict led to at least 9,759 civilian casualties during the 2007-2010 period of the Afghan war, according to a United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) estimate. The conflict in Afghanistan spilled over into the Pakistan leading to terrorist attacks and military operations taking a toll on Pakistani citizens and the Pakistani state. Moreover, at least 98,170 Iraqi civilians have been killed during the war in Iraq and the ensuing conflict in the Middle Eastern country.

On May 2, 2011, President Obama announced, “Tonight, I can report to the American people and to the world that the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al Qaeda, and a terrorist who's responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children.”

This file photo taken in 1989 shows Osama bin Laden (C) walking with Afghanis in the Jalalabad area. In 1984, Bin Laden traveled to Afghanistan, responding to calls for a jihad, or holy Islamic war, against the Soviet occupying force. There, he financed and took command of a force of some 20,000 fighters recruited from around the world. In 1988, bin Laden founded his group al Qaeda (the base). The Soviet Union withdrew its forces from Afghanistan in 1989. Al Qaeda went on to become a worldwide network of Islamic ex
This file photo taken in 1989 shows Osama bin Laden (C) walking with Afghanis in the Jalalabad area. In 1984, Bin Laden traveled to Afghanistan, responding to calls for a jihad, or holy Islamic war, against the Soviet occupying force. There, he financed and took command of a force of some 20,000 fighters recruited from around the world. In 1988, bin Laden founded his group al Qaeda (the base). The Soviet Union withdrew its forces from Afghanistan in 1989. Al Qaeda went on to become a worldwide network of Islamic ex
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden speaks in this still image taken from video released on a website. In 1991, a US-led alliance launched a war to expel Iraqi forces from Kuwait, which Iraq had occupied the previous year. Bin Laden declared jihad against the United States because it has based forces in his native Saudi Arabia, where Islam's two most holy places are located. ? Reuters (File Photo)
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden speaks in this still image taken from video released on a website. In 1991, a US-led alliance launched a war to expel Iraqi forces from Kuwait, which Iraq had occupied the previous year. Bin Laden declared jihad against the United States because it has based forces in his native Saudi Arabia, where Islam's two most holy places are located. ? Reuters (File Photo)
This file photo taken on September 11, 2001 shows pedestrians running from the scene as one of the World Trade Center Towers collapses in New York after a plane taken over by terrorists crashed into the Twin Towers. Two hijacked US airliners crashed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center, which subsequently collapsed. A third hijacked plane crashed into the Pentagon outside Washington and a fourth in rural Pennsylvania. ?  AFP (File Photo)
This file photo taken on September 11, 2001 shows pedestrians running from the scene as one of the World Trade Center Towers collapses in New York after a plane taken over by terrorists crashed into the Twin Towers. Two hijacked US airliners crashed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center, which subsequently collapsed. A third hijacked plane crashed into the Pentagon outside Washington and a fourth in rural Pennsylvania. ? AFP (File Photo)
The Pentagon is seen on fire after a hijacked aircraft crashed into it in this September 11, 2001 file photo.  The attacks killed around 3,000 people. ? Reuters (File Photo)
The Pentagon is seen on fire after a hijacked aircraft crashed into it in this September 11, 2001 file photo. The attacks killed around 3,000 people. ? Reuters (File Photo)
US President George W. Bush listens as White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card informs him of a second plane hitting the World Trade Center while Bush was conducting a reading seminar at the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida in this September 11, 2001 file photo. ? Reuters (File Photo)
US President George W. Bush listens as White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card informs him of a second plane hitting the World Trade Center while Bush was conducting a reading seminar at the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida in this September 11, 2001 file photo. ? Reuters (File Photo)
A rescue helicopter surveys damage to the Pentagon as firefighters battle flames after an airplane crashed into the US military Headquarters outside of Washington in this September 11, 2001 file photo. 
Bin Laden was named principal suspect for coordinating the attacks in New York and Washington and Washington offered a 25-million-dollar reward for any information leading to the arrest of bin Laden.? Reuters  (File Photo)
A rescue helicopter surveys damage to the Pentagon as firefighters battle flames after an airplane crashed into the US military Headquarters outside of Washington in this September 11, 2001 file photo. Bin Laden was named principal suspect for coordinating the attacks in New York and Washington and Washington offered a 25-million-dollar reward for any information leading to the arrest of bin Laden.? Reuters (File Photo)
An activist carries a portrait of wanted terrorist Osama bin Laden while another shouts anti-US slogans during a demonstration in Karachi on October 7, 2001. 
On October 7, US-led strikes on Afghanistan begin, aimed at forcing the ruling Taliban to hand over bin Laden. Bin Laden vows no peace for the US and its citizens in a message broadcast via the Al-Jazeera television network. ? AFP (File Photo)
An activist carries a portrait of wanted terrorist Osama bin Laden while another shouts anti-US slogans during a demonstration in Karachi on October 7, 2001. On October 7, US-led strikes on Afghanistan begin, aimed at forcing the ruling Taliban to hand over bin Laden. Bin Laden vows no peace for the US and its citizens in a message broadcast via the Al-Jazeera television network. ? AFP (File Photo)
Members of the 11th Reconnaissance Squadron from Indian Springs, Nev., perform pre-flight checks on the Predator unmanned aerial vehicle prior to a mission, in this November 9, 2001 file photo shot at an undisclosed location. Pakistanis have long protested against the US drone campaign on the Afghan border, which stepped up under the Obama administration as it prepared to draw down troops in the 10-year war in Afghanistan. The air raids also go to the heart of the resentment that Pakistanis feel against the United
Members of the 11th Reconnaissance Squadron from Indian Springs, Nev., perform pre-flight checks on the Predator unmanned aerial vehicle prior to a mission, in this November 9, 2001 file photo shot at an undisclosed location. Pakistanis have long protested against the US drone campaign on the Afghan border, which stepped up under the Obama administration as it prepared to draw down troops in the 10-year war in Afghanistan. The air raids also go to the heart of the resentment that Pakistanis feel against the United
Osama bin Laden (L) sits with his adviser and purported successor Ayman al-Zawahiri, an Egyptian linked to the al Qaeda network, in an image supplied by the Dawn newspaper November 10, 2001. ? Reuters (File Photo)
Osama bin Laden (L) sits with his adviser and purported successor Ayman al-Zawahiri, an Egyptian linked to the al Qaeda network, in an image supplied by the Dawn newspaper November 10, 2001. ? Reuters (File Photo)
US Special Operation Capable (SOC) Marine SSGT Rodric Green from Corsicana, Texas, with the 26th Marines Expeditionary Unit (MEU), draws a target on a picture of Osama bin Laden before the start of an urban combat and room clearing exercise aboard the USS Whidbey Island, off the coast of Pakistan, December 12, 2001. ? Reuters (File Photo)
US Special Operation Capable (SOC) Marine SSGT Rodric Green from Corsicana, Texas, with the 26th Marines Expeditionary Unit (MEU), draws a target on a picture of Osama bin Laden before the start of an urban combat and room clearing exercise aboard the USS Whidbey Island, off the coast of Pakistan, December 12, 2001. ? Reuters (File Photo)
Supporters of Pakistan's Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam, known for its close ties with the ousted Afghan Taliban, attends an election campaign rally of the Mutahidda Mujlis-e-Amal, while holding portraits of US most wanted chief of al Qaeda network Osama bin Laden in the southwestern city of Quetta on October 7, 2002. ? AFP (File Photo)
Supporters of Pakistan's Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam, known for its close ties with the ousted Afghan Taliban, attends an election campaign rally of the Mutahidda Mujlis-e-Amal, while holding portraits of US most wanted chief of al Qaeda network Osama bin Laden in the southwestern city of Quetta on October 7, 2002. ? AFP (File Photo)
In 2001, former president of Pakistan, Pervez Musharraf agreed to join forces with United States as an ally in the Global War on Terror, following the 9/11 attacks. ? AFP (File Photo)
In 2001, former president of Pakistan, Pervez Musharraf agreed to join forces with United States as an ally in the Global War on Terror, following the 9/11 attacks. ? AFP (File Photo)
Pakistani army troops patrol on a deserted street in Mingora, the capital of Swat Valley, on May 27, 2009. At least 2,795 Pakistani soldiers have been killed in fighting since 2004. Another 8,671 have been wounded in the war against terrorism. ? AFP (File Photo)
Pakistani army troops patrol on a deserted street in Mingora, the capital of Swat Valley, on May 27, 2009. At least 2,795 Pakistani soldiers have been killed in fighting since 2004. Another 8,671 have been wounded in the war against terrorism. ? AFP (File Photo)
In this image taken on Nov. 17, 2009, Pakistani troops walk through the damaged market in Sararogha, a town of the troubled Pakistani tribal region of South Waziristan along the Afghan border. ? AP (File Photo)
In this image taken on Nov. 17, 2009, Pakistani troops walk through the damaged market in Sararogha, a town of the troubled Pakistani tribal region of South Waziristan along the Afghan border. ? AP (File Photo)
US President Barack Obama is pictured after announcing live on television the death of Osama bin Laden, from the East Room of the White House in Washington May 1, 2011. Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed on Sunday in a firefight with US forces in Pakistan and his body was recovered, Obama announced on Sunday. ? Reuters (File Photo)
US President Barack Obama is pictured after announcing live on television the death of Osama bin Laden, from the East Room of the White House in Washington May 1, 2011. Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed on Sunday in a firefight with US forces in Pakistan and his body was recovered, Obama announced on Sunday. ? Reuters (File Photo)
Revelers drive through the streets of Washington waving a US flag after US President Barack Obama announced live on television the death of Osama bin Laden, May 1, 2011. The news was hailed by governments around the world but many cautioned that the fight against extremism was not over. ? Reuters (File Photo)
Revelers drive through the streets of Washington waving a US flag after US President Barack Obama announced live on television the death of Osama bin Laden, May 1, 2011. The news was hailed by governments around the world but many cautioned that the fight against extremism was not over. ? Reuters (File Photo)
A reveler riding on a car cheers in Washington, late May 1, 2011, after US President Barack Obama announced live on television the death of Osama bin Laden. ? Reuters (File Photo)
A reveler riding on a car cheers in Washington, late May 1, 2011, after US President Barack Obama announced live on television the death of Osama bin Laden. ? Reuters (File Photo)

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Comments (24) Closed

Huma
May 02, 2011 03:17pm
I doubt this could happen.
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Indian
May 02, 2011 04:28pm
and again this is happened in Pakistan, thats why you people hv no doubt
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Brian
May 02, 2011 06:02pm
He would have been eliminated before 9/11 if President Clinton would have done same as President Obama did last night, not reporting to Pakistani government until operation is completed.
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Abuzain
May 02, 2011 06:38pm
What a perfect timing! Just when they needed a fresh reason to bolster their case against Pakistan as the most dangerous place in the world they discovered the most dangerous man from it's soil. The quick disposal of his body is enough to disenchant the remaining few gullibles in the world that this victory and this news have been manufactured. Nobody believes you, America.
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ben trott
May 02, 2011 08:01pm
Pakistan is the best place for these kind of persons... I am wondering, how he can stay long period in Pakistan.
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Ali Suliman Mohamed
May 02, 2011 09:24pm
America is justified in protecting its citizens. It does a far better job than the government of Pakistan does in protecting its citizens. Bin Laden’s death did not come a minute too soon. He killed thousands of good Muslims and gloated over their blood. Bin Laden’s body today feeds the predators of the deep.
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sameer
May 02, 2011 09:33pm
@ Indian: and we have no doubt that you, like other indians, are entangled in the web of yellow journalism running in your country! This filthy trend of journalism has been adapted from the western media culture and so it is travelling to Pakistan! The point of discussion ends on the sentence mentioned by Abuzain " the most dangerous place in the world!" huh! we live here, we know how lovely and peaceful our Country is! it is the western targeted approach or rather I should say, US approach to declare Pakistan a flop nation. By the way, how many of us have tried to analyse the situation portrayed by the media? what if the real picture was that US has hunted him down in afghanistan and bought his body to Pakistan just to play this drama that we caught him in Pakistan?since US jets and helicopters are not checked by any officials here, this drama appeals to me atleast! how come an area which is under the army control and where majority of the army resides were not aware of his presence? We certainly don't believe you Mr. america! Pakistan Zindabad (Y)
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SAIF ALAM
May 02, 2011 10:14pm
its not true america is just creating a story to invade pakistan........?????????
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Nipun
May 02, 2011 10:50pm
Poor Pakis crying foul again.. ! :D
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hamza
May 03, 2011 12:16am
10 years, 12 billion dollars , 100k killed to get 1 man !! pathetic and then they go dump him in the sea , do they really think the public is that stupid ! ..... he was probably dead any way ...excellant exit strategy !
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Fruit Forbidden
May 03, 2011 02:58am
What do they take us for! They shot a picture of him in the head and quickly got rid of it. A very unceremonious death of "World's Most Wanted Man Ever"!
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golsar
May 03, 2011 05:56am
Pakistan is a terrorist country I see
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juma
May 03, 2011 08:50am
Now no doubt to world that Pakistan generating militants.
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umar
May 03, 2011 09:07am
Osama is alive........
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Harpreet
May 03, 2011 10:00am
My heart cries, as I see the invasion of the sovereignty of your country, by no one else, but the inventor of crime itself. What are you guys doing about it?
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Harpreet
May 03, 2011 10:06am
Brian, I guess you are an American, You do not see the bigger problem here, and tat also goes with the short sighted approach of the west. No war can be won by mere force, but just love, and this will create more so called terrorist (For me they are using the means available to them, to fight a huge enemy, the west), Further, this is an act of terrorism from the US side, getting in to a country with authority, just because, the US is more powerful, that too is shifting. The American days are over, the paradigm has shifted my friend.
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R C Desai
May 03, 2011 10:07am
Why do you want to live in the world of make believe? Osama was threat to peace and to all individuals irrespective of religion or nationalality.
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The Human
May 03, 2011 10:29am
Why No pics, like saddam, y US leaving place for controversy to build up..... Mess? They sud have taken proper pics videos to show,whats harm in that
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yaqoob
May 03, 2011 10:44am
Well done America you killed Osama , made him the symbol of resistance aganist the imperial power, Well done America , you killd Osama, now more Osama's will emerge and they will be more dangerious than their hero. Well done America now be ready for next catestrophy. You are now in the middle of the end game, soon you will be perished .
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Ismail Shah
May 03, 2011 10:55am
America looking for the safe exit from Afghanistan and her forces. Because American Economy going down and weaker every month. so to stop funding to Pakistan and Afghanistan and her forces in Afghanistan, to boost her economy. . . . . .
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epsilon
May 03, 2011 11:15am
Even I do doubt over the originality of the news. US Prez and other high profile figures speak too good to believe.
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epsilon
May 03, 2011 11:17am
dude, your two statements are contradicting each other :)
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Masroor
May 03, 2011 11:31am
I guess Gen. Kiyani and Gen. Pasha should tell us whats is going on in our country?? (i want this to be answered by the army coz the politicians of our country are of no good at all and the army is the claimant that they are the ones who are protecting the country) Why do we have such a big army when they didnt have a clue when the americans flew from the other side of the border into our territory and amazingly ended up operating right next to a military installation. Either they think we are a bunch of fools as a nation or the pride of Pakistan "The Pak Army" isnt capable.
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Tariq Amin
May 03, 2011 04:31pm
I think Bin Laden is already dead guys. US government is just using his name in order to justify the expenses on the War of Terror and to get political benefits. I think the current news on Bin Laden is just for the sake of getting reelected in Presidential elections. And after elections we r just going to receive another video of Bin Laden threatening America. I think war on terror should not be associated with the life and death of bin laden. It should be associated with religious tolerance. The moment, this world had learnt religious tolerance; Peace will be inevitable.
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