Construction begins on world’s biggest telescope

Published December 6, 2022
TRADITIONAL dancers perform during the launch of the construction of Square Kilometre Array radio telescope outside the town of Carnarvon, South Africa, on Monday.—Reuters
TRADITIONAL dancers perform during the launch of the construction of Square Kilometre Array radio telescope outside the town of Carnarvon, South Africa, on Monday.—Reuters

SYDNEY: Australia on Monday started building a vast network of antennas in the Outback, its section of what planners say will eventually become one of the most powerful radio telescopes in the world.

When complete, the antennas in Australia and a network of dishes in South Africa will form the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a massive instrument that will aim to untangle mysteries about the creation of stars, galaxies and extraterrestrial life.

The idea for the telescope was first conceived in the early 1990s, but the project was plagued by delays, funding issues and diplomatic jockeying.

The SKA Observatory’s Director General Philip Diamond described the beginning of its construction as “momentous”.

The telescope “will be one of humanity’s biggest-ever scientific endeavours”, he said.

Its name is based on the planners’ original aim, a telescope that could observe a one-square-kilometre surface, but the current South African and Australian sections will have a combined collecting area of just under half that, according to the observatory.

Both countries have huge expanses of land in remote areas with little radio disturbance — ideal for such telescopes.

More than 130,000 Chris­tmas tree-shaped antennasare planned in Western Australia, to be built on the traditional lands of the Wajarri Aboriginal people.

They have dubbed the site “Inyarrimanha Ilgari Bundara”, or “sharing sky and stars”.

“We honour their willingness to share their skies and stars with us as we seek to find answers to some of the most fundamental science questions we face,” said Diamond.

The South African site will feature nearly 200 dishes in the remote Karoo region, according to the organisation.

Published in Dawn, December 6th, 2022

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