Racists out of tune with changing world: Archer

Published November 12, 2019
England’s fast-bowling sensation Jofra Archer says cricket fans who resort to racist abuse should realise times have moved on and the world is a much more multicultural place. — Reuters/File
England’s fast-bowling sensation Jofra Archer says cricket fans who resort to racist abuse should realise times have moved on and the world is a much more multicultural place. — Reuters/File

LONDON: England’s fast-bowling sensation Jofra Archer says cricket fans who resort to racist abuse should realise times have moved on and the world is a much more multicultural place.

The Barbados-born bowler has quickly become a favourite with the England fans since he became eligible to play for his adopted country earlier this year.

The Sussex star benefited from the ECB reducing the eligibility period from seven years to three so he did not have to wait till 2022.

He quickly showed his worth by bowling the decisive Super Over in the thrilling World Cup final win over New Zealand.

He then marked his Test debut by flooring Australia’s star Steve Smith in the second Ashes Test at Lord’s which saw him miss the following match at Headingley with concussion.

It was in the fourth Test at Old Trafford — which Australia won to ensure they retained the Ashes — that Archer, 24, was barracked by a couple of fans.

“I was aware what the guys were saying — something about my passport -- but I blanked them,” he told The Daily Mail. “It was only later that Joe Root said the guys got ejected.

“It was the first time I’d seen someone get ejected from a ground, because there were some abusive fans when we played Pakistan at Trent Bridge.”

Archer, who says an elderly spectator at a county game with Kent had queried how was he playing for Sussex, said racist incidents occurred far less in cricket than football.

“The world’s changing,” he said. “It’s becoming more multicultural. A lot of people have accepted it for what it is. Look at the England cricket team — there’s huge diversity.”

Published in Dawn, November 12th, 2019

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