Dutch ban on burqas takes effect

Published August 2, 2019
The Dutch legislation was passed in June 2018 after more than a decade of political debate on the subject. — AFP/File
The Dutch legislation was passed in June 2018 after more than a decade of political debate on the subject. — AFP/File

THE HAGUE: The Netherlands banned the wearing of a face-covering veil, such as a burqa or niqab, in public buildings and on transport from Thursday as a contentious law on the garment worn by some Muslim women came into force.

Between 200 and 400 women are estimated to wear a burqa or niqab in the country of 17 million people.

The Dutch legislation was passed in June 2018 after more than a decade of political debate on the subject.

Far-right politician Geert Wilders had proposed the face-covering veil ban back in 2005.

The Dutch interior ministry issued a statement saying: “From now on the wearing of clothing which covers the face is banned in educational facilities, public institutions and buildings, as well as hospitals and public transport.” People must be recognisable in public spaces, so the ban also applies to face-covering helmets or hoods, punishable by a fine of 150 euros ($165).

The Dutch law does not ban the wearing of a burqa on the street, unlike France’s ban which took effect in 2010. Belgium, Denmark and Austria have similar laws.

The move appeared to be unpopular with the general public in The Hague.

“Ridiculous. I find it ridiculous. You should respect each other’s values and I think it’s the dumbest rule they ever thought of,” Anne Spillner, 28, said.

Hasnaa, 21, said people “should have this freedom to wear whatever we want, to express ourselves just thro­ugh the way that we look”.

For the ban to be enforced, the interior ministry said it was instructing school, hospital and transport staff to refuse entry to women wearing a veil.

And if the woman refuses to comply, then “they can call the police”. But the police, who frequently call for more resources from the government, said they did not regard enforcing the ban as “an absolute priority”.

The public transport authorities said bus, tram and metro drivers would not stop to ask a burqa-clad woman to leave or wait for police to arrive, as that would lead to delays.

“Drivers can very well decide not to say anything,” said the head of the OVNL public transport association, Pedro Peters.

Hospitals also said they would still treat people regardless of what they are wearing.

Published in Dawn, August 2nd, 2019

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