Boxer Amir Khan admits he is thinking of retirement

Published July 29, 2019
Amir Khan celebrates after defeating Devon Alexander in their welterweight bout Saturday, December 13, 2014, in Las Vegas. — AP/File
Amir Khan celebrates after defeating Devon Alexander in their welterweight bout Saturday, December 13, 2014, in Las Vegas. — AP/File

The British boxer of Pakistan origin Amir Khan, who is adamant to fight Filipino superstar Manny Pacquiao, has admitted that he is thinking of retirement, UK tabloid Daily Star reported on Sunday.

Khan secured a knockout win against Australia's Billy Dib to claim the WBC international welterweight title in Jeddah this month. After winning the title, he had claimed a deal to fight Pacquiao had been secured, citing November 8 and Saudi Arabia to be the date and venue of the big event.

Pacquiao's camp was quick to dismiss the claim, however.

"I was just told what to say in the press conference by my advisors. I think it was all very badly handled," Khan was quoted as saying by Daily Star.

"I just think the only way a fight like that will happen is if me and Pacquiao sit together and talk. Well see if it happens next year. We both know its a big fight which can make a lot of money.

"Look, its the final chapter now. A couple of more fights — honestly. I've done well in the sport financially, winning titles and making a name for myself. It's all about now just enjoying the last bit — the last few fights — and just calling it a day really," he said.

Khan his health and family was everything for him. "Everything you do is for your family. I want to be in one piece for when I'm spending time with them."

"You're always just one punch away from getting hurt. I never want that one punch to land on me, you know? Before its too late [...] so lets see how it goes."

Last weekend, Pacquiao became the oldest welterweight champion in history. The 40-year-old defeated WBA Super champion Keith Thurman in a split decision in Las Vegas.

According to Daily Star, Khan is adamant he would offer a far tougher challenge for the veteran.

“I’ve worked with him for years and years — I know him quite well,” he added.

“I think honestly I’d give him a lot of problems. He fought Thurman who’s got slow feet and slow hands.

“With me he’ll have a lot of problems because I move my hands fast, have better footwork and more head movement. I wouldn’t just stand there and get hit.

“You have to still give him credit, but he’s not the same Pacquiao he was a couple of years ago.”

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