SARGODHA: A two-day International Food and Nutrition Conference began at the University of Sargodha (UoS) on Tuesday to raise awareness against social and economic consequences of malnutrition.

According to a press release, the conference and food expo are being organised by the UoS Institute of Food Sciences and Nutrition in which researchers, academics, scientists and food experts from USA, UK, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia and Iran are participating.

The conference is aimed at sharing the latest advancements, knowledge and technologies regarding food production and nutrition.

The event’s themes include food processing and preservation, post-harvest technology, food waste management, food security, safety and quality, food microbiology and biotechnology, food chemistry, food service and management, halal foods, functional and medicinal foods, public health, clinical and industrial nutrition and indigenous foods.

Dr Keshavan Niranjan from the University of Reading, UK, sharing his thoughts on ‘Food engineering research – where from and where to’ said, “With chronic diseases becoming a major societal concern, and diet preferences being a major cause of chronic diseases, the link between food and health has become the dominant driver for food engineering research in the 21st Century.”

Dr Zulkifli Khair from the University of Technology, Malaysia, presenting his research on ‘Global issue on food insecurity in higher education institutes’ suggested researchers to conduct more systemic studies in colleges and universities worldwide, and recommend comprehensive and sustainable solutions, including holistic empowerment on food assistance programmes.

Aslam Shaheen said getting safe food had become an international issue, particularly in the developing countries where the situation was worsening day by day. He said unsafe food was putting adverse impacts on human life and increasing death ratio.

Dr Masood Sadiq, President, Pakistan Society of Food Scientists and Technologists, shared his research on ‘Novel trends in functional foods and nutraceutical: role in economic development’. He said the developing countries could supply functional foods in the global market and gain economic returns by introducing therapeutic compounds from the indigenous raw materials. It was also helpful for farming community in developing links with private sector, he added.

Dr Javed Aziz, Country Director, IFANCA, Pakistan, shared his research on “Halal and Tayyab - path to prosperity”. He said the with surge in the Muslim population the Islamic or the “Halal” economy was expected to grow from $1.24 trillion in 2016 to $1.93 trillion by 2022.

Institute of Food Science and Nutrition Director Dr Anjum Murtaza said the aim was to discuss the issues relating to the agricultural sector and their solutions.

Published in Dawn, February 27th, 2019

Opinion

Editorial

More than economics
Updated 05 Oct, 2022

More than economics

Ishaq Dar’s appointment is but a sign of the paradigm shift in economic policymaking.
Dens of corruption
05 Oct, 2022

Dens of corruption

MOST prisons in Pakistan are a microcosm of the inequitable and exploitative world outside their walls. A probe by...
Football tragedy
05 Oct, 2022

Football tragedy

SPORTS arouses the rawest of human emotions. Football is no exception — in fact, the passions on display at...
Cipher inquiry
Updated 04 Oct, 2022

Cipher inquiry

Inquiry will likely end nowhere, or, worse, be used as a tool of victimisation.
Further delay?
04 Oct, 2022

Further delay?

KARACHI Administrator Murtaza Wahab’s announcement that the second phase of Sindh’s LG polls — primarily...
Losing to England
04 Oct, 2022

Losing to England

AFTER tantalisingly close finishes in the fourth and fifth matches against an England side visiting the country for...