Nato ends combat mission in Afghanistan after 13 years

Published December 29, 2014
KABUL: Personnel of the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force stand with their heads bowed during a ceremony marking the end of Isaf’s combat mission in Afghanistan.—AFP
KABUL: Personnel of the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force stand with their heads bowed during a ceremony marking the end of Isaf’s combat mission in Afghanistan.—AFP

KABUL: Nato formally ended its war in Afghanistan on Sunday, holding a low-key ceremony here after 13 years of conflict that have left the country in the grip of worsening violence.

The event was arranged in secret because of the threat of Taliban strikes in the Afghan capital, which has been hit by repeated suicide bombings and gun attacks over recent years.

“Together... we have lifted the Afghan people out of the darkness of despair and given them hope for the future,” Nato Commander US Gen John Campbell told assembled soldiers. “You’ve made Afghanistan stronger and our countries safer.”

Also read: Afghanistan won’t be source of attacks again: US

On Jan 1, the US-led International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) combat mission, which has suffered 3,485 military deaths since 2001, will be replaced by a Nato “training and support” mission.

About 12,500 foreign troops staying in Afghanistan will not be involved in direct fighting, but will assist the Afghan army and police in their battle against the Taliban, who ruled from 1996 until 2001.

When numbers peaked in 2011, about 130,000 troops from 50 nations were part of the Nato military alliance.

“I hope you take great pride in the positive impact you’ve made and will continue to make upon the Afghan people,” Gen Campbell said in a speech released by Isaf on Twitter as live broadcasts were banned for security reasons.

He folded up the Isaf flag and unveiled the flag of the new mission, named Resolute Support.

The ceremony -- held in a sports hall at Nato headquarters -- completed the gradual handover of responsibility to the 350,000-strong Afghan forces which have been in charge of nationwide security since last year.

But recent bloodshed has highlighted fears that the international intervention has failed as Afghanistan faces spiralling violence.

The United Nations says that civilian casualties hit a record high this year, jumping by 19 per cent with 3,188 killed by the end of November.

Afghan police and army have also suffered a grim death toll, with fatalities soaring to more than 4,600 in the 10 months -- far higher than all Isaf deaths since 2001.

“The US and Nato mission was an absolute failure as today’s ceremony shows,” Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid told AFP.

“They are fleeing from Afghanistan. They have not reached their goals in defeating the Afghan mujahideen.”

United States and Afghan commanders insist the national security forces can hold the line against the Taliban despite concerns of a repeat of Iraq, where an American-trained army virtually collapsed in the face of a militant onslaught.

Published in Dawn, December 29th, 2014

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