Number of institutes offering business degrees. Source: AACSB International.
The business education landscape is about to change in Pakistan. The decades-old dominance of leading biz schools will soon be challenged by the Karachi School for Business and Leadership (KSBL), which is about to launch an MBA in collaboration with the Judge Business School at Cambridge University.

For years, the Institute of Business Administration in Karachi and the Lahore University of Management Sciences had a near monopoly on talent in business education in Pakistan. The two prestigious schools attracted the best faculty in management sciences, which in turn attracted the best and the brightest students seeking business and management education. This duopoly will soon face competition from KSBL, which is a $100-million initiative championed by Hussain Dawood, a renowned Pakistani businessman and a philanthropist. KSBL is now accepting applications for MBA starting in September 2012.

While being a 100-year old professional designation, MBA continues to be desired by hundreds of thousands of aspiring business managers. The first graduate business school was established at Harvard University in 1908. The school was staffed by 15 faculty members and 33 regular students. By 2008, no fewer than 155,367 students graduated with a master’s degree in business administration in the United States alone.

Another 335,000 received a bachelor’s degree in the same discipline. Business schools have become the largest faculty by size on campuses across North America. The Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University in Toronto is one of the largest business schools in Canada with over 9,000 students. In the US alone, three bachelor’s degrees are awarded in business administration for every one degree conferred in engineering

Despite its popularity from the very beginning in 1908, the MBA designation took 42 years to extend its reach beyond the US. The Richard Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario in Canada in 1950 became the first non-American university to offer an MBA.   It took another seven years for the MBA to sail across the Atlantic to reach Europe where INSEAD near Paris became the first European school to offer an MBA designation.

AACSB, a group responsible for accrediting business schools, today boasts 1,182 schools as its members of which 607 schools have already been accredited. AACSB’s estimates reveal that around 12,100 educational institutions worldwide are offering business degrees. Approximately 82 institutes have been reported to offer business degrees in Pakistan. As expected, only a small number of Pakistan-based institutes offer high quality business curriculum and training. The rest comprise business schools that lack libraries, computing faculties, lecture halls and most importantly adequate faculty members. A quick look at the websites of business schools in Pakistan will reveal that most faculty members do not have a terminal degree in their field and more often than not faculty members lack training in disciplines related to management and business.

Source: Wolfram Alpha (http://www.wolframalpha.com/)

Unlike Pakistan, where only two business schools achieved prominence, several business schools in India achieved global fame. The most renowned of such schools is the Indian Business School, which has partnered with other leading business schools in the west. Also recognised globally are the Indian Schools of Management who have become a gold standard for business education in India and abroad. Apart from the dozen-odd famous business schools, another 1,600 institutions offer business education in India.

Another success story from India is the large contingent of Indian-born academics who have risen to prominence in North America and Europe. In fact, the current dean of the Harvard Business School is an Indian-born academic Nitin Nohria, who is now leading the transformation of the same school that pioneered the MBA pedagogy.

Earlier this month, I attended a two-day symposium about transforming the MBA curriculum in Tampa, Florida. The symposium was led by two Harvard Business School professors: Srikant Datar and David Garvin. Srikant, also an Indian-born academic, has co-authored a book with David Garvin on rethinking the MBA curriculum. Their book is influencing academics in business schools that are entrusted in transforming the business curriculum to meet the societal needs.

The business education in Pakistan continues to be offered in the same style and with almost the same contents as is being offered in the west. This results in a serious disconnect between the challenges faced by businesses in Pakistan and the training being provided. Teaching the same curriculum as is being taught in the west may prepare graduates of Pakistan’s business programs to meet the business needs in the west, however these students remain ill-equipped to help businesses succeed in Pakistan.

The courses in financial derivatives offered in Pakistan, for instance, teach largely the same curriculum as is being taught at the business schools in Chicago and Montreal, the two cities with large derivatives exchanges in North America. At the same time, Pakistan is a large producer of cotton and hence Pakistan-based curricula should focus on finding innovative market solutions to make cotton crops resilient to floods and crop diseases rather than focussing on cotton futures. And while the business schools in the west research and teach about high performance manufacturing, the business schools in Pakistan instead should focus on sustaining production in a resource-constrained economy where manufacturing units are being shut down at an alarming rate because of intermittent supply of electricity and chronic fuel shortages.

Notice in the following graph how India excelled in export intensity (measured as export dollars per capita) in the past few years while Pakistani businesses struggled against all odds including, but not limited to, infrastructure deficit, security concerns, poor governance and regulation, and lack of entrepreneurship.

Another big challenge in Pakistan is the lack of entrepreneurial culture. University graduates spend enormous time searching for employment in a job market where the private sector is collapsing while the public sector continues to absorb hoards of unemployed youth in state-owned corporations who have long become a huge burden on taxpayers for their lack of competitiveness, which has forced many such institutions effectively into default. The unemployed or partially employed in Pakistan instead could focus on creating small enterprises to offer goods and services needed by the low-income consumers whose numbers in Pakistan run into hundreds of millions.

There is indeed fortune lying at the bottom of the pyramid. C. K. Prahalad, a renowned business professor who was born in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, made this point in his book, The fortune at the bottom of the pyramid. He wrote: “Collectively, the world's 5 billion poor have vast untapped buying power. They represent enormous potential for companies who learn how to serve this market by providing the poor with what they need. This creates a win-win situation: not only do corporations tap into a vibrant market, but by treating the poor as consumers they are no longer treated with indignity; they become empowered customers.”

I would argue that one needs not to rely solely on corporations to serve the needs of those at the bottom of the pyramid. In the presence of an enterprising culture, the untapped value can be captured by the young indigenous entrepreneurs who are intimately aware of the constraints and opportunities that lie in a resource-constrained market place as the one existing in Pakistan. There is therefore a need to educate the youth about entrepreneurship and value creation.

This presents a unique and hitherto unexplored opportunity for business schools in Pakistan. Instead of replicating what is being taught at the Harvard Business School or its imitations and enlisting faculty who may not have a first-hand experience of bathing with only a bucket full of water, the business schools may consider tapping into the local talent by recruiting successful indigenous business leaders to teach the future generations of entrepreneurs about how they managed to succeed in the inhospitable business climate in Pakistan.

I believe that the students in Pakistan would benefit more from listening to Pakistani entrepreneurs, such as Hussain Dawood, who have run successful businesses in Pakistan, than from foreign-based academics who at best would have a 30,000-feet view of those who lie at the bottom of Pakistan’s pyramid.

Murtaza Haider, Ph.D. is the Associate Dean of research and graduate programs at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University in Toronto.  He can be reached by email at murtaza.haider@ryerson.ca

The views expressed by this blogger and in the following reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Dawn Media Group.

Updated Apr 05, 2012 12:03pm

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Comments (53) (Closed)


Labd
Apr 07, 2012 02:17am
India has a median age of 25. That translates to 600 million people younger than 25. Extrapolating to other countries in the region, South Asia would have almost a billion people who could potentially be interested in an MBA or other higher education. Demand clearly outstrips supply. If Pakistan wants to have some dominant presence in the global economy, it will have to invest in education.
Azim Abbas
Apr 05, 2012 05:21pm
I wonder why we are running after MBA degree only and only if MBA is the key to success for a nation. Answer is that its simplest to make money through MBA. For heaven sake, please keep these enterpreneurs out of education sector as their interest is in making money..... rather good money, and our policy makers provided them this oppertunity in past. Mr Murtaza would you please tell us if all Pakistanis can afford IBA, LUMS, KSBL or even PIMSAT? Its government responsibility to provide free and quality education. Please tell us the cost of quality education in India and if their best institutes are of Public sector or private sector.... or any of your example of developed countrys' institute is of private sector ........ its shame for us and its just an example of capitalism........would you send your kids in Sindh University or Baluchistan University or Bahauddin Zikriya University?
Naeem Abbas
Apr 05, 2012 05:46pm
agree
Faryal
Apr 05, 2012 06:37pm
Your points are quite valid Murtaza, but let me share some insights regarding one of the Leading business schools in Pakistan whom you consider part of duopoly “IBA". The institute may be textually following western books but thanks to the vision of our current dean Dr. Ishrat the teaching pedagogy is completely re-engineered to meet indigenous needs. There are strong collaborative efforts on linkage between academia and industry, preparing the students to get well equipped with local business challenges. The institute has already embarked on a successful journey of instilling entrepreneurship seeds in letter and spirit among its students and as you rightfully mentioned to "educate the youth about entrepreneurship and value creation".
Pakistani
Apr 06, 2012 12:58am
Education is good when there are jobs otherwise it will depress a nation further create jobs that will be good then creating more un-employed educated ppl.
shahgardez
Apr 06, 2012 10:50pm
Though it look to be an excellent article to promote KSBL howeve, closer look gives drawbacks in the article. For example: At first author told KSBL will start with foreign partner. Whereas, laterly, the author provides drawback of foreign education copying. Secondly, its not only Mr. Hussain Dawood who will lecture the audience. One or many enterpreneur are already lecturing at IBA and LUMS. In order to improve his argument, author must give concrete examples of how the course will really be difference then previous counter parts.
Shujaat
Apr 06, 2012 04:32am
Murtaza - definitely an interesting point you've raised and potentially a solution to all of Pakistan's problems i.e. innovation and creativity. Nurture these, and we're all set. One thing we might need to watch out for, is that there’s a fundamental difference between a successful Pakistani businessman vs the one in the US. The average Pakistani success story potentially bribed, back-stabbed and lied his way to the top. In other words, he cheated on his taxes, stole electricity, bribed the government employees at multiple touch-points and probably made incredible 'facilitation donations' along the way. Let’s say “played dirty” to keep this simple. The average American success story on the other hand had a high reliance on hard work and creativity to reach the pinnacle. They might have briefly touched on some grey areas of business ethics but on the whole their highlights are almost always clean. Therein lies the true difference between our societies... black and white. Of course there are exceptions in both Pakistan and the US. The key is to weed out these exceptions in Pakistan and bring them to the fore front, create role models out of them; those who genuinely struggled through adversity and rose as victors without any significant 'grey acts'. All you need is a healthy combination of these guys with some Harvard academics; you got yourself a Business school that'll make ripples in the country if not the region. I kid you not.
Ravi (San Jose,Calif
Apr 06, 2012 04:52am
@Pakistani: Wrong, sorry do not agree with the view that education is useful only when opportunities are there.India had opportunities only in the last decade but emphasis on education has been there all along in Indian middle class families. Education, Education and Education was the only reason India's recent economic surge. My family is one such example. Two generations ago, we were in very poor state,my grandfather worked as coolie with road repair works but he like many of his friends at the time wanted to give good education to his children.My father used to walk miles to goto school, studied under street lights in the night and was the first one to get a degree from the village.Now we are raised with same values, always study comes first. My father's salary barely made ends meet but again education was highest priority in the family and he managed to make all of us kids study engineering.Today we all live comfortably in US making good salaries, my kids goto good private schools in US. Mine is not an isolated case, half of my relatives now either live in US or work for mnc's in India.Two generations ago,same families were living on daily wages. Had my grandfather not put efforts to make my dad study,situation would have been different today.
Madhav Badami
Apr 06, 2012 07:58am
I agree with Murtaza Sahab's conclusion that Pakistani students will benefit more by seeking to learn from the experience of Pakistani entrepreneurs, rather than from foreign-based academics or business programs modelled on those in the West that might not be sensitive to (or even aware of!) local realities. There is a more fundamental question though: to what extent, if at all, can MBA programs train students to be effective managers and business leaders? On this question, it is well worth listening to Henry Mintzberg: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffwHKsm4kxw
BRR
Apr 06, 2012 09:10am
Good article, and quite illuminating. The "bottom of the pyramid" has its own challenges that large corporations may neither comprehend nor is capable of addressing. It takes local expertise, indidenous technologies, culturally compatible solutions and innovative marketing to create solutions for the bottom of the pyramid.
zehra
Apr 06, 2012 10:28am
At the same time, Pakistan is a large producer of cotton and hence Pakistan-based curricula should focus on finding innovative market solutions to make cotton crops resilient to floods and crop diseases rather than focussing on cotton futures. this is the course for MBA or technical engineering? this would be more apt if is is taught in the fields of bo chemnistry and engineering at the best, not at bussiness level, And while the business schools in the west research and teach about high performance manufacturing, the business schools in Pakistan instead should focus on sustaining production in a resource-constrained economy where manufacturing units are being shut down at an alarming rate because of intermittent supply of electricity and chronic fuel shortages. they do, however mba offers a brad reading and understanding, but the projects and reports casestudies that are given during the course are actually for the same purpose so that the students are able to apply the principles and learn from thel ocal market! it is far too easy to crtisicse and compalin, and Karachi School for Business and Leadership (KSBL), which is about to launch an MBA in collaboration with the Judge Business School at Cambridge University. how come just by partenring with a foreign college antoher school will be as good as the current? dsnt that actually negate your later points? that they should focus more on local then foreign ?
prafulla shrivastva
Apr 06, 2012 10:34am
Dear Murtaza, I feel more number of good quality Business Schools should come up in Pakistan as it gives in depth knowledge of International Market & teach how to penetrate in the same. Pakistan has enormous potential in doing good business in the world but it has been ignored by the govt and even big industrialists of Pakistan. One should encourage good business practices in Pakistan so people will be attracted & come up.
Imad
Apr 06, 2012 11:22am
KSBL is offering MBA at a very high fee. Such a fee is beyond affordability by bright but less resourceful students and their parents. IBA offers a lot of scholarships and don't let a student, who has qualified its entrance test, to fall off due to resource constraints. No such scholarship offer is available on KSBL yet. And moreover, if the school is working in collaboration with JUDGE Business School then it should offer the education at a subsidized rate to Pakistani which is an impoverished third world country, on the contrary it is charging premium fee much higher than IBA. Thouhg IBA used to offer subsidized education 5 years back it is now self sustaining so it has increased its fee structure, still KSBL is charging nearly double that of IBA. Mr.Murtaza haider is unaware that IBA's evening and Executive MBA programs are taught by professionals from the industry who are experts in their fields, they are not permanent faculty of IBA rather they are paid on a per course basis for their professional time. So they give a realistic picture of what the real world problems are being faced and how the educational curriculum relates to them. Its not utopia, the curriculum that IBA follows is US based, but its mapping is done by local career professionals, who are i a better position to judge and advocate solutions due to their experience and insights into the local industry's structure and problems .
Bilal
Apr 07, 2012 05:27pm
Salim, just to give you a single point to think over why we compare ourselves with India, take a closer look at the second graph and you'll know. I suggest you do a little bit of research before you make a fool out of yourself next time. regards,
A.Bajwa
Apr 07, 2012 05:20pm
Pakistan's Business Institutes must teach business law and so should the law Schools.
Salim
Apr 06, 2012 12:18pm
Why we see everything in light of India is a tough question ? Why don't we compare our-self with our own peers like Afganistan, Iraq, Somalia, Sudan etc. That will show our achievemnts in better light.
razi mallick
Apr 06, 2012 12:33pm
This article gives an image of advertisement of the business school. IBA and Lums are doing good jobs and role of these instituitins must be appreciated as pioneers in business education. It is premature to pass any judgement about merits or demerits of KSB. But artticle like such in the the most prestigious paper Dawn has the risk of creating biasedness in mind of the readers, and I think it is against business ethics. There should be different between an article and advertisement.
housewife from india
Apr 06, 2012 08:38pm
All Indian business schools are not partnering with universities in the west. IIMs( various Indian Institutes of Management are a clear case)l. IIMs are now gold standard as you say, with multinationals scooping them every term resulting in a serious brain drain in the country. A good no. of them go on to lead multinationals in a decade of so. But behind all this, you have to see the battalions and battalions of engineers and technicians and commerce graduates whom India is producing year after year, some of whom march on to join the management schools. Without this never-drying base of solid engineering and science and commerce graduates, opening of more business schools is of little consequence. As someone pointed out, education is part of Hindu/Indian culture (although i would like to refrain from using this term). We do seem to accord a great significance to education than many other Asians as I have witnessed personally in Middle-East. As India opened up its market, industrialization and employment generation picked up, with the economy getting capable of absorbing maximum graduates produced by thousands of engineering, science, commerce and management institutions in the country. Pakistan should do more on this front. New private law schools are also doing extremely well in India as corporate law is now more on focus than ever before in our history. This is relevant and possible only if a nation reaches a certain level of growth, industrialization and development. Still, thanks for a very nice write-up.
Ravi
Apr 06, 2012 08:22pm
@Yasir, I agree that liberalization,deregulation and other factors have helped but education was the main reason it all came together. If India were like say afghanistan in terms of education developement, then liberalization etc., wouldnot help. America and other countries saw India already has many educated professionals looking for opportunities who could work for lot cheaper compared to their counterparts. At the same time many Indians abroad have made good reputaion and some are in the highest positions in the respective fields.All of these helped trigger the new boom in India with education being the key factor.
Pakistan Classified
Apr 06, 2012 02:05pm
The Private sector needs to come up with high standards, There are thousands of students getting their MBA degrees but they have no clue what so ever where they will be heading to. Raise the standards and see the difference.
Junaid Ali khan
Apr 06, 2012 02:30pm
What is the purpose of article except to advertise and promote the launch of new business school.
Faisal
Apr 06, 2012 03:18pm
Excellent article. I think the author was just trying to explain his point of view that we should focus on local resources and how to maximize benfits through these resources when he wrote that "Pakistan-based curricula should focus....................than focussing on cotton futures". I fully agree that the entrepreneurship field which is so vital to a developing economy like Pakistan is looked down in our prestigious business schools. For e.g. not a single case study done in most of the MBA classes pertains to local issues or entrepreneurs. While reading about Steve Jobs and Bill Gates is extremely fascinating, we donot have the enabling environment to do the same type of work here. We should instead be reading about Mansha, Hussain Dawood or even Asad Umar or how they created or transformed huge business empires into their own image through sheer hard work and strong will. We should even be discussing about Edhi or Alamgir Welfare Trust when teaching Social Entrepreneurship. However I have optimistic that the trasnaformation has already started with initiatives like teh entrepreneurial center at IBA or KBS. However so much more need to be done before our MBAs prefer working locally rather than looking to find opportunities outside.
Ravi (san jose,Calif
Apr 06, 2012 03:32pm
Wrong, sorry do not agree with the view that education is useful only when opportunities are there.India had opportunities only in the last decade but emphasis on education has been there all along in Indian middle class families. Education, Education and Education was the only reason behind India’s recent economic surge. My family is one such example. Two generations ago, we were in very poor state,my grandfather worked as coolie with road repair works but he like many of his friends at the time wanted to give good education to his children.My father used to walk miles to goto school, studied under street lights in the night and was the first one to get a degree from the village.Now we are raised with same values, always study comes first. My father’s salary barely made ends meet but again education was highest priority in the family and he managed to make all of us kids study engineering.Today we all live comfortably in US making good salaries, my kids goto good private schools in US. Mine is not an isolated case, half of my relatives now either live in US or work for mnc’s in India.Two generations ago,same families were living on daily wages. Had my grandfather not put efforts to make my dad study,situation would have been different today.
Bilal
Apr 07, 2012 06:13pm
Excellent point Ravi. Most people view education just as a means of getting a job. Even if there are no jobs, an educated person will have far better contribution to the society than otherwise.
meena
Apr 06, 2012 05:04pm
would you rather have a person who is uneducated and jobless or a jobless person with a good education? its not just about having a job......education is a part of grooming too
Yasir
Apr 06, 2012 05:00pm
Sorry but I have to disagree with you, Sri Lanka stands better than India in education but the factors that led to India's success is liberalization of its economy, deregulation in many forms, cheap labor, actions taken against the license culture. You cannot attribute its success to education only. Economics is not about education only, there is a whole lot of system that should work together in conformity.
Ali.
Apr 07, 2012 03:18am
I like ravi's reply.
Noman
Apr 07, 2012 05:53pm
Excellent article. The mix of foreign best practices and local entrepreneurship can help a lot.
Cool Monk
Apr 07, 2012 11:36am
Absolutely!!
Mubashir Wasi
Apr 07, 2012 11:46am
exactly, its all part of PR and word of mouth, and yah i am a business student thats why i know...
anurag
Apr 07, 2012 12:27pm
agreed, education is a way to live life, why one should be behind to others let the knowledge spread make the world safer place to live, proud on what your country achieving on the field of economy not for ..............others.
Ravi (San Jose,Calif
Apr 08, 2012 09:18am
you are spot on. one correction, I wouldnt say Hindu culture, it is Indian culture that whether Hindu,Muslim,Sikh or Christian most of the middle class families value education a lot.
prafulla shrivastva
Apr 08, 2012 11:11am
All Corporate houses should adopt one village of Pakistan, All Political Leaders should adopt one city of Pakistan, All Former cricketer should adopt on Street of Karachi, Islamabad & they should focus only on education & improving literacy rate of Pakistan because an educated person can visualise everything differently. I am sure a strong & established Pakistan can stabilise everything correctly. If people of Pakistan get bread for both time than only they can think for the nation. Now they have scarified lots of things for the nation so they should get reward for that.
gary
Apr 12, 2012 05:33pm
Indians are the second richest community in UK after the jews. In education,they are the second best after the chinese.
ABHI
Apr 18, 2012 07:31pm
Indian Institute of Managemet (IIM) are government MBA institutes and are public sector institutes. One of the Best Managment schools in India and ones with the most difficult entrance tests to get admitted.
Zaman
Apr 17, 2012 11:25am
agreed with you Mr.Azam abbas, we are focusing on particular class which can afford these institutions.
Prashant
Apr 16, 2012 11:17am
Ditto same story with me..Only difference, I went to IIT Kharagpur and stayed back in India and currently working for Yahoo! as a principle engineer in Bangalore.
ABHI
Apr 18, 2012 07:34pm
On continuation to my previous post - The cost of education in India and management studies in India cost a too much. but again there are various financial institutes which are available to help you in form of student loan (of course depending upon your calibre to get into good institutes) .... I have done my higher studies by taking a student loan. ..
Mohammad
Apr 27, 2012 01:09pm
Thats actually a wonderful Idea..I wish I had the means to implement something like that
Pakistani
Apr 25, 2012 05:00am
True Analysis Pakistani businessman vs the one in the US. The average Pakistani success story potentially bribed, back-stabbed and lied his way to the top. In other words, he cheated on his taxes, stole electricity, bribed the government employees at multiple touch-points and probably made incredible 'facilitation donations' along the way. Let’s say “played dirty” to keep this simple. The average American success story on the other hand had a high reliance on hard work and creativity to reach the pinnacle.
Mohammad
Apr 27, 2012 01:12pm
Because you should always compete with someone who is doing well...someone who is better..or else you will never strive for betterment.
Murad Iqbal
May 18, 2012 10:45am
I agree with you Ravi. Education pays your generations.
asif ali
May 22, 2012 05:35am
today the education is becoming doing business, it all about business not in real meaning of education. business education is pity different from other fields in my opinion because their is less research in business education as we required more research on business strategies and management theories. and particularly the accountants have less visualization and implementing business strategies in businesses and life.
Guest
Jun 07, 2012 01:57pm
Business educations needs to be more technical and quantitative. Currently business graduates in Pakistan are like graduates of liberal arts of humanities programs which utterly lack in rigor. Focus should be on mathematical applications in business, such as statistics, operations research, quantitative finance, industrial engineering, management science etc. Focus should also be on information systems. Currently business graduates in Pakistan don't know heads or tails of computer programming and IT tools; they should be skilled in these. I also don't know of any good engineering department in Pakistan which offers industrial / systems engineering. There is a limit to how many mechanical / electrical / software / nuclear / aeronautical engineers etc. can be absorbed by the Pakistani economy, since it is not a high-tech economy, as most developing economies (including even the larger ones like China and India) are not for the most part. Instead the Pakistani economy is based on the business of non high tech goods (textiles, agriculture, manufacturing, etc.), and so what it needs is a labor force that is skilled in the sophisticated large-scale management of these businesses rather than one which is skilled in the sophisticated engineering business, as such industries are not viable or existent today in Pakistan by and large. However, the only skilled labor produced to try to meet the requirement of sophisticated management are the ones from the regular business programs (such as IBA) which churn out graduates that are very unsophisticated, as their familiarity with the technical and quantitative applications in business is usually next to nil, at least from my observation. They are given only a very high-level view of business which is only useful I think if you are a billionaire investor or banker but not so much if you are actually trying to run or create a large business. IBA has collaboration with Babson College USA in Entrepreneurship, which is mostly useless for most employers, but I see no collaboration in any technical or quantitative field which could contribute to efficient management of organizations.
Mubeen Alum
May 24, 2012 07:17am
This Is a Great Article Here sir! well written.
A.Bajwa
Jun 10, 2012 02:00pm
Business education should be made a major subject in government colleges as well. In modern age it is the requirement for intellectual development. and to earn a living as well.
Abbas
Jun 27, 2012 02:52pm
Hi Ravi & Faizan, I would say that Ravi point that education pays is very valid. May be there is a similarity between two nations on that front. Only issue is that in Pakistan when we look around due to corruption, bad governance and some other key issues the opportunities are getting less. I should admire India in that manner since at least India tried to keep some control on influx of expertise from abroad. In our case due to bias nature of policy and decision makers unfortunately the very educated ones are also suffering. I have many examples to share from different organisations UNDP, their contractors, Development agencies working here take more than half as incentives back to their own country while on books they come to Pakistan for development. Recently I have read few articles/ blogs where people even complain about what happening in few MNCs or bigger organisations e.g Brith American Tobabbo which is known as Pakistan Tobacco and in India its known as Indian Tobacco or similar. Most of the top employees there in direct business units have been replaced by Bengolees. Its Sad and one should make noise about this. Where is the right for our own graduates and business experts. How come these big organisations invest and in return take back performing an eye wash.
Muhammad Faizann
Jun 13, 2012 07:07am
Sorry Ravi, but your comment seems to be out of context. Murtaza's piece is about tranformation of the business education with respect to the needs of Pakistani situation.
siddra
Jul 05, 2012 10:12am
yeah its true because education is the only survival of humans without education we are no where, because it guides you provides you the avenues for exploration. this can only be achieved through spreading education throughout the country.all the developed nations are among those whose literacy rates are pretty good.
guest
Jun 26, 2012 02:29pm
Hi Ravi, You are right. May be there is a similarity between two nations on that front. Only issue is that in Pakistan when we look around due to corruption, bad governance and some other key issues the opportunities are getting less. I should admire India in that manner since at least India tried to keep some control on influx of expertise from abroad. In our case due to bias nature of policy and decision makers unfortunately the very educated ones are also suffering. I have many examples to share from different organisations UNDP, their contractors, Development agencies working here take more than half as incentives back to their own country while on books they come to Pakistan for development. Recently I have read few articles/ blogs where people even complain about what happening in few MNCs or bigger organisations e.g Brith American Tobabbo which is known as Pakistan Tobacco and in India its known as Indian Tobacco or similar. Most of the top employees there in direct business units have been replaced by Bengolees. Its Sad and one should make noise about this. Where is the right for our own graduates and business experts. How come these big organisations invest and in return take back performing an eye wash.
prafulla shrivastva
Jul 26, 2012 03:39pm
It is important for starting lots of business schools in Pakistan which will encourage more number of students in joining this stream. God has given opportunities at all the places & skills to everybody. I have seen pakistani cooks & hotels are very popular in all the countries as they cook nice non veg foods so lots of new entrepreneurship can be cultivated & they will generate so much employments of various pakistanis all over the world specially in USA, UK, Canada, UAE. Similarly food processing industries can be successful in Pakistan as various types of fruits & vegetable are produced there.
gary
Jul 25, 2012 07:44pm
An Indian muslim is better educated than a Pakistani muslim in UK. That is due to the value of education in the Indian culture.
gary
Jul 25, 2012 07:53pm
Pakistanis should study in IITs and in IIMs. They will work in India first and then go to Pakistan. Good step for collaboration.