De Kock escapes fake fielding charge over Fakhar Zaman's controversial run-out

Published April 5, 2021
Fakhar Zaman (R) reacts after being run out by South Africa's Aiden Markram (not visible) as South African wicketkeeper Quinton de Kock (L) looks on during the second ODI between South Africa and Pakistan at Wanderers Stadium in Johannesburg on April 4. — AFP
Fakhar Zaman (R) reacts after being run out by South Africa's Aiden Markram (not visible) as South African wicketkeeper Quinton de Kock (L) looks on during the second ODI between South Africa and Pakistan at Wanderers Stadium in Johannesburg on April 4. — AFP

South African wicketkeeper Quinton de Kock is unlikely to face any sanction over the run-out of Fakhar Zaman during the Proteas' 17-run win in the second ODI, according to reports.

After reviewing footage of the incident, match officials are believed to have come to the conclusion that de Kock was not in breach of the law on fielders deceiving batsmen.

In the last over of the match, with Pakistan still needing 30 to win, de Kock seemingly gestured for South African Aiden Markram to throw to the bowler's end, where Haris Rauf was heading.

Fakhar, who had struck an outstanding 193, looked behind him, away from the direction of the fielder, as he was running towards the wicketkeeper and was surprised when Markram's throw hit the stumps at that end.

Social media immediately went into overdrive with cries that de Kock had flouted the law on fake fielding which states that “it is unfair for any fielder wilfully to attempt, by word or action, to distract, deceive or obstruct either batsman after the striker has received the ball.”

Fakhar admitted after the match that he had been taken by surprise but did not attempt to deflect blame for the dismissal on to cheating by the South African wicketkeeper.

“I was looking at Haris Rauf because I thought the run-out would be at his end. It was my own fault,” he said at the post-match press conference.

Officials are understood to have deemed that de Kock's actions were not a trick and that he was indicating for the throw to go to the bowler's end.

South African fielder Tabraiz Shamsi tweeted on Monday that de Kock was calling for a fielder to back up the throw at the non-striker's end.

“QDK was NOT speaking 2 or pointing at the batsman, he was asking a fielder to back up at the non strikers end,” tweeted Shamsi.

“Not Quinny's fault the batsman turned around 2 see instead of completing the run safely which he should have done.”

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