US grants Huawei another 90 days to buy from American suppliers

Published August 19, 2019
FILE - In this March 7, 2019 file photo, two men use their mobile phones outside a Huawei retail shop in Shenzhen, China's Guangdong province. — AP/File
FILE - In this March 7, 2019 file photo, two men use their mobile phones outside a Huawei retail shop in Shenzhen, China's Guangdong province. — AP/File

The United States will extend a reprieve that permits China's Huawei Technologies to buy components from US companies to supply existing customers, the US Commerce Department said on Monday, but it also moved to add more than 40 of Huawei's units to its economic blacklist.

The extension, dated Thursday and first reported by Reuters on Friday, was announced by US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, even though US President Donald Trump suggested on Sunday that no such reprieve would be granted.

Shares of US chip makers that sell to Huawei rose, including those of Qualcomm, Intel and Micron Technology.

Read more: Some Google apps may stop working on Huawei phones amid US-China trade war

The 90-day extension “is intended to afford consumers across America the necessary time to transition away from Huawei equipment, given the persistent national security and foreign policy threat,” the department said in a statement.

“As we continue to urge consumers to transition away from Huaweis products, we recognise that more time is necessary to prevent any disruption,” said Ross.

Huawei said in a statement that the temporary extension “does not change the fact that Huawei has been treated unjustly. Today's decision won't have a substantial impact on Huawei's business either way.”

Trump had indicated over the weekend that there would be no extension, saying what would happen would be the “opposite” of what was reported on Friday.

“We're actually open not to doing business with them,” Trump said on Sunday.

The US government blacklisted Huawei in May, alleging the Chinese company is involved in activities contrary to US national security or foreign policy interests.

Shortly after the blacklisting, the US Commerce Department allowed Huawei to purchase some American-made goods in a move designed to minimise disruption for its customers, including rural US telecommunications firms that use Huawei equipment in their networks.

Ross said the latest extension also was aimed at aiding those same customers. At the same time, he said he was adding 46 Huawei affiliates to the so-called “Entity List” — a list of companies effectively banned from doing businesses with US firms — raising the total number to more than 100 Huawei entities covered by the restrictions.

The list includes Huawei affiliates in Argentina, Australia, Belarus, China, Costa Rica, France, India, Italy, Mexico and numerous other countries.

Huawei said it opposes the decision to add another 46 affiliates to the Entity List. “It's clear that this decision, made at this particular time, is politically motivated and has nothing to do with national security,” the company said.

'Plenty of notice'

The extension, through Nov 18, renews an agreement continuing the Chinese company's ability to maintain existing telecommunications networks and provide software updates to Huawei handsets.

The US Commerce Department also said on Monday it is requiring the exporter, re-exporter, or transferor to obtain a certification statement from any Huawei entity prior to using the temporary general license.

Asked what will happen in November to US customers of Huawei, Ross said: “Everybody has had plenty of notice of it, there have been plenty of discussions with the president.”

The semiconductor industry has lobbied to sell non-sensitive items that Huawei could easily buy abroad, arguing that a blanket ban harms American companies.

When the US Commerce Department blocked Huawei from buying US goods earlier this year, it was seen as a major escalation in the Sino-US trade war.

As an example, the blacklisting order cited a pending federal criminal case concerning allegations that Huawei violated US sanctions against Iran. Huawei has pleaded not guilty in the case.

The order noted that the indictment also accused Huawei of deceptive and obstructive acts.

At the same time, the US says Huawei's smartphones and network equipment could be used by China to spy on Americans, allegations the company has repeatedly denied.

Huawei, the world's largest telecommunications equipment maker, is still prohibited from buying American parts and components to manufacture new products without additional special licenses.

Many Huawei suppliers have requested the special licenses to sell to the firm. Ross told reporters late last month he had received more than 50 applications, and that he expected to receive more.

He said on Monday that there were no “specific licenses being granted for anything.”

Washington trade lawyer Doug Jacobson said it is not surprising the extension was granted. “It takes time for telecom providers to find alternative equipment suppliers,” he said.

Of $70 billion that Huawei spent buying components in 2018, about $11bn went to US companies.

Opinion

De-programming the robot
25 Jul 2021

De-programming the robot

The robot that is programmed to be a predator, to dominate, to hurt, to rape, to kill, will do as he pleases, where he pleases...
A toxic discourse
Updated 25 Jul 2021

A toxic discourse

Politics as it exists now is a catalyst for further divisions...
Cyberespionage
25 Jul 2021

Cyberespionage

Sellers of surveillance tools must be held accountable...
Managing human agency
24 Jul 2021

Managing human agency

Is the private sector able to manage the ‘human agency’ of teachers better than the public sector?...

Editorial

Noor murder case
Updated 25 Jul 2021

Noor murder case

IT would not be an exaggeration to describe Pakistan as no country for women. This truth was underscored yet again...
25 Jul 2021

Rental inflation

HOUSE rent prices soared in June by 6.21pc from 4.2pc a year ago, topping the list of 10 contributors to the urban...
Cyberattack on rights
Updated 24 Jul 2021

Cyberattack on rights

A COLLABORATIVE investigation into a data leak of software sold by the Israeli surveillance company NSO Group has ...
24 Jul 2021

Sleeper cells

THERE was a time not too long ago when militant groups had unleashed a reign of terror in Pakistan, resulting in...
24 Jul 2021

Prisoners’ return

THE families of 62 Pakistani prisoners who had been imprisoned in Saudi Arabia had reason to rejoice this Eid as...