Alert Sign Dear reader, online ads enable us to deliver the journalism you value. Please support us by taking a moment to turn off Adblock on Dawn.com.

Alert Sign Dear reader, please upgrade to the latest version of IE to have a better reading experience

.

The Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (Pemra) on Thursday issued a warning to various satellite TV channels found violating the Pemra's Electronic Media Code of Conduct, 2015, and the code of conduct prescribed by the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) for media outlets.

The authority observes in its notice: "Despite issuing an advice and verbal discourse with all the licensees no significant compliance is witnessed on the television screens. Satellite TV channels are persistently airing Live marathon transmissions/press conferences by political leadership containing defamatory and derogatory content targeting various state institutions specifically judiciary and armed forces of Pakistan."

The notice then goes on to highlight the relevant sections of the Pemra code of conduct the news channels are found in violation of as can be seen in their tweet below:

Pemra's notice to TV news channels

It has warned all channels to "ensure that no hateful, defamatory, malicious, and derogatory content/speech/press conference/paid political advertisement is aired, broadcast or televised in any manner, live or recorded, which may likely undermine the sanctity of judiciary, armed forces of Pakistan, other institutions, individuals, political parties and the electoral process".

In the event that any licensee is found violating the provisions outlined in the notice, "strict action shall be initiated by the authority without any notice or further opportunity of hearing".

No convicted person to be given space on PTV

It emerged on Thursday that the Pakistan Television (PTV) issued an office order earlier this week, directing all staff to strictly ensure that "no convicted person is to be shown or talked about on any PTV channel/programme, whether in paid advertisements, news or current affairs talk shows".