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This handout photo shows a 13.6mm Vijayan’s Night Frog (Nyctibatrachus pulivijayani) being held in Agasthyamala in the southern Indian state of Kerala. Scientists have discovered four new species of miniature night frogs small enough to sit on a fingernail in a remote part of India, according to a report published on Tuesday. The researchers, who spent five years exploring the lush Western Ghats mountains, said the tiny amphibians were there in abundance but had likely been overlooked because of their size.—AFP
This handout photo shows a 13.6mm Vijayan’s Night Frog (Nyctibatrachus pulivijayani) being held in Agasthyamala in the southern Indian state of Kerala. Scientists have discovered four new species of miniature night frogs small enough to sit on a fingernail in a remote part of India, according to a report published on Tuesday. The researchers, who spent five years exploring the lush Western Ghats mountains, said the tiny amphibians were there in abundance but had likely been overlooked because of their size.—AFP

NEW DELHI: Scientists have discovered four new species of miniature night frogs small enough to sit on a fingernail in a remote part of India, according to a report published on Tuesday.

The researchers, who spent five years exploring the lush Western Ghats mountains, said the tiny amphibians were there in abundance but had likely been overlooked because of their size.

They also found three other species of night frogs, according to the report in the PeerJ medical sciences journal.

“The miniature species are locally abundant and fairly common but they have probably been overlooked because of their extremely small size, secretive habitats and insect-like calls,” researcher Sonali Garg was quoted as saying. Indian night frogs split off from other frogs some 70 to 80 million years ago, making them a particularly ancient group.

Published in Dawn, February 22nd, 2017


Comments (6) Closed



Mady Feb 22, 2017 12:08pm

Really pleasant news between reports of species going extinct.

Mian M Amin(Old Ravian) Feb 22, 2017 01:55pm

where are our researchers ?

Mr s Feb 22, 2017 02:59pm

Nature is always mysterious.

M. Emad Feb 22, 2017 03:43pm

Two new frog species discovered in Bangladesh (from Dhaka city and Barisal district) in recent years.

kerala Feb 22, 2017 03:52pm

These frogs are so common here believe me they are as vocal as other nocturnal frogs. I didn't knew these were new species.I thought these are already included somewhere in "western"journals. Unless a person is not interested in flora and fauna studies,these remain unnoticed. Many indigenous varieties are living among us as unsung heros-especially in Asia. I'm happy that Indianscientists added this Indian nomenclature to the world knowledge.

Houlbelat Feb 22, 2017 04:01pm

I have seen such miniature frogs in Western Africa. They were very active and agile, leaping up to six feet in a single jump even from a wall to wall of a bathroom. Amazing feat in comparison to their tiny size. Initially, I took them for small spiders before they started jumps on slight agitation.