19 September, 2014 / Ziqa'ad 23, 1435

Kashmir shrine aftermath

A major fire gutted the 200-year-old shrine of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelani, also known as Dastigheer Sahib, a revered Sufi Muslim in Indian Kashmir June 25, sparking clashes between police and residents in the region's summer capitalSrinagar, police said. Nearly two dozen people were injured in the violence, triggered by anger at the perceived delayed response of firefighters in battling the blaze. – Photos by AFP

A Kashmiri Muslim looks on inside the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelani.
A Kashmiri Muslim looks on inside the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelani.
Kashmiri pedestrians walk past the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelani, also known as Dastigheer Sahib, in downtown Srinagar.
Kashmiri pedestrians walk past the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelani, also known as Dastigheer Sahib, in downtown Srinagar.
Bystanders (2nd and 3rd Right) grieve as fire services personnel and volunteers clear debris.
Bystanders (2nd and 3rd Right) grieve as fire services personnel and volunteers clear debris.
A major fire gutted a 200-year-old, revered Sufi Muslim shrine in Indian Kashmir June 25, sparking clashes between police and residents in the region's summer capital Srinagar.
A major fire gutted a 200-year-old, revered Sufi Muslim shrine in Indian Kashmir June 25, sparking clashes between police and residents in the region's summer capital Srinagar.
A Kashmiri Muslim woman grieves as unseen fire services personnel and volunteers clear debris from the charred remains of the shrine.
A Kashmiri Muslim woman grieves as unseen fire services personnel and volunteers clear debris from the charred remains of the shrine.
A Kashmiri Muslim volunteer helps clear debris inside the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelani, also known as Dastigheer Sahib, in downtown Srinagar.
A Kashmiri Muslim volunteer helps clear debris inside the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelani, also known as Dastigheer Sahib, in downtown Srinagar.
A Kashmiri Muslim volunteer looks on as he helps clear debris inside the charred remains of the shrine.
A Kashmiri Muslim volunteer looks on as he helps clear debris inside the charred remains of the shrine.
Fire services personnel and volunteers clear debris inside the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine.
Fire services personnel and volunteers clear debris inside the charred remains of the 200-year old shrine.

Comments (5) (Closed)


Ali
Jul 01, 2012 12:10pm
Virendra there is nothing wrong in going to graves as long as you pray for them not pray from them, what people dont get is how can one who is no more in this world & is at god's mercy how can they help others, why not pray/ask directly from god?
Khizr
Jun 28, 2012 11:18am
It is a great tourist and historical site and helps the economy of SriNagar. It should be rebuilt while keeping the surviving (historical) structure in tact.
saythetrurth
Jun 29, 2012 07:40am
It is just a grave site and has no historical importance in Islam other than it is a grave site of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelan who was scholar of Islam. Build a school for Children instead of another Shrine it will do a lot more good for Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelan "Akhrah" here after . Grave worship has become so common among Muslims, people say they ask Sheikh to request Allah to make things easy for them but when Quran tells them you only need Allah and Allah alone can give you, ask Allah for help and you don't need any Sheikh between you and Allah. May Allah have his Mercy on the great scholar of Islam Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jeelan and guide the ignorant Muslims to follow the true teaching of Islam, only ask Allah for help.
Pradip
Jun 29, 2012 12:48pm
Funny reading your post....reminds me of why Christianity split into Catholics and Protestants. You seem to be speaking the voice of Martin Luther - the German priest who engineered the schism against the Vatican.
virendra kaul
Jun 30, 2012 05:11am
Absolutely! These are historical heritages and for some have religious sentiments attached. Nothing wrong in it. Kashmir has traditionally the sufi Islam practiced all through. Probably that was the reason, it had peace all through it's history. What is wrong with going to graves? Some may not agree which is fine but don't get aggressive with this who differ with you. Tolerance is the key. There is a point when "saythetruth" says make a school instead. But it could also be said build a school too.