North Korea fires anti-aircraft missile before UN Security Council meeting

Published October 2, 2021
This picture, taken on September 30, 2021 and released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on October 1, shows a test-fire of a “newly developed” anti-aircraft missile carried out by the Academy of Defence Science. — AFP
This picture, taken on September 30, 2021 and released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on October 1, shows a test-fire of a “newly developed” anti-aircraft missile carried out by the Academy of Defence Science. — AFP

SEOUL: North Korea has successfully fired a new anti-aircraft missile, state media said on Friday, as the United Nations Security Council prepares to meet in response to a recent flurry of weapons tests by the nuclear-armed nation.

The anti-aircraft missile had a “remarkable combat performance” and included twin rudder controls and other new technologies, the official Korean Central News Agency said.

A picture in the official Rodong Sinmun newspaper showed the missile ascending at an angle into the sky from a launch vehicle on Thursday.

It is the latest in a series of tension-raising steps by Pyongyang, which had until recently been biding its time since the change in US administrations in January.

In September, it launched what it said was a long-range cruise missile, and earlier this week tested what it described as a hypersonic gliding vehicle, which South Korea’s military said appeared to be in the early stages of development.

And on Wednesday, the North’s leader Kim Jong Un decried Washington’s repeated offers of talks without preconditions as a “petty trick”, accusing the Biden administration of continuing the “hostile policy” of its predecessors.

South Korea’s defence ministry told AFP it was unable to immediately confirm the latest launch.

Anti-aircraft missiles are much smaller than the ballistic missiles the North is banned from developing under United Nations Security Council resolutions, and harder to detect from afar.

Pyongyang is under multiple international sanctions over its weapons programmes, which have made rapid progress under Kim, including missiles capable of reaching the whole of the US mainland and by far its most powerful nuclear test to date.

The latest tests have sparked international condemnation, with US Secretary of State Antony Blinken saying they created “greater prospects for instability and insecurity”.

Friday’s UN Security Council meeting on North Korea, called by the United States, Britain and France, was originally due to take place on Thursday.

But it was delayed by Russia and China, who asked for more time to study the situation, a diplomatic source said.

Beijing is Pyongyang’s key ally and in normal times its biggest provider of trade and aid, although the North has since early last year been under a self-imposed blockade after it shut its borders to defend itself against the coronavirus pandemic.

The North has a long history of using weapons tests to ramp up tensions, in a carefully calibrated process to try to forward its objectives.

With its latest actions, Kim was looking to “test the waters with Washington” and its “threshold for weapons provocations”, Soo Kim of the RAND Corporation told AFP.

“He may wish to see how much he can get away with until the Biden administration starts to flinch,” she added.

The South’s President Moon Jae-in has recently reiterated his calls for a formal declaration that the Korean War is over — hostilities ceased in 1953 with an armistice rather than a peace treaty.

Moon has only a few months left in office and Soo Kim pointed out he could be looking to secure an “accomplishment” with the North before his term runs out.

Published in Dawn, October 2nd, 2021

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